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United Nations-backed Medicines Patent Pool reached an agreement with Merck and its partner Ridgeback Biotherapeutics allowing MPP to license the manufacture of molnupiravir to pharmaceutical companies across the globe. Christopher Occhicone/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Occhicone/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Julian Assange's partner, Stella Moris, addresses protestors outside the High Court in London, Wednesday. The U.S. government is scheduled to ask Britain's High Court to overturn a judge's decision that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange should not be sent to the United States to face espionage charges. A lower court judge refused extradition in January on health grounds. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

A worker leans against a gasoline pump that has been turned off at a gas station in Tehran. Gas stations across Iran on Tuesday suffered through a widespread outage of a system that allows consumers to buy fuel with a government-issued card, stopping sales. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

A paramilitary vehicle passes the front gate of Government Medical College in Srinagar, Indian controlled Kashmir on Tuesday. Police have registered two separate cases under harsh anti-terror law against students and some staff of two medical colleges for celebrating Pakistan's victory over archrival India in a T20 World Cup cricket game. Mukhtar Khan/AP hide caption

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Mukhtar Khan/AP

Princess Mako, who became Mako Komuro, and her husband, Kei Komuro, pose during a news conference at Grand Arc Hotel on Tuesday in Tokyo to announce their wedding. Nicolas Datiche/Pool//Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Datiche/Pool//Getty Images

Japan's Princess Mako will relocate to New York after marrying a nonroyal

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Sudanese protesters lift national flags as they rally on 60th Street in the capital Khartoum, to denounce overnight detentions by the army of government members, on Oct. 25, 2021. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Containers of Moderna COVID-19 vaccine doses, donated by the United States, arrive in Bogota, Colombia, in July. The U.S. plans to send more than a billion vaccines abroad by September 2022. Leonardo Munoz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Leonardo Munoz/AFP via Getty Images

What the U.S. can — and cannot — do for vaccine equity per the State Department

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Two men who slipped and fell on a steep rock leading into rough waters at a park in British Columbia were saved thanks to a group of Sikh men who unraveled and removed their turbans to create a makeshift rope. @OMNIpunjabi/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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@OMNIpunjabi/Screenshot by NPR

Emissions rise from Duke Energy's coal-fired Asheville power plant in Arden, N.C., in 2018. Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Charles Mostoller/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Children from Hong Kong sing at the Sutton Friendship Festival last month as the London borough welcomed new arrivals from the former British colony. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

The U.K. is welcoming tens of thousands from Hong Kong on a new path to citizenship

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Artists paint a mural on a wall near Scottish Events Centre (SEC) in Glasgow, which will host the U.N. climate summit starting Sunday. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

The COP26 summit to fight climate change is about to start. Here's what to expect

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In this frame taken from video people gather Monday during a protest in Khartoum, Sudan. Military forces arrested Sudan's acting prime minister and senior government officials Monday, disrupted internet access and blocked bridges in the capital Khartoum, the country's information ministry said, describing the actions as a coup. AP hide caption

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AP

In this photo released by the Colombian presidential press office, one of the country's most wanted drug traffickers, Dairo Antonio Usuga, alias "Otoniel," leader of the violent Clan del Golfo cartel, is presented to the media at a military base in Necocli, Colombia, Saturday, Oct. 23. AP hide caption

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AP

Xining's Dongguan Mosque has been a source of community for Chinese Muslims for seven centuries. Here, Hui Muslim men pray in the mosque in 1983. Dru Gladney/Pomona College hide caption

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Dru Gladney/Pomona College

China is removing domes from mosques as part of a push to make them more 'Chinese'

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