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Gulls were eating more juvenile salmon than biologists realized, which meant fewer of the fish were making it to the ocean. Gary Hershorn/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

Pastry chef Katlyn Beggs and chef Patrick Mulvaney plan desserts for an upcoming dinner at his B&L restaurant in the Midtown neighborhood of Sacramento, Calif. Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Andrew Nixon / Capital Public Radio

Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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Brent Henderson harvests soybeans on his farm near Weona, Ark., in 2017. That crop showed symptoms of dicamba exposure. Henderson switched to Xtend soybeans the following year, he says, as "insurance" against future damage. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Is Fear Driving Sales Of Monsanto's Dicamba-Proof Soybeans?

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Lunch clubs are becoming a popular trend in offices as a way for co-workers to brighten each other's days by sharing meals they've prepared for one another. They might eat together or at their own separate desks. Ella Olsson/Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Ella Olsson/Flickr Creative Commons

A row of new reverse vending machines, which collect drink containers for recycling, greets customers at the grand opening of the BottleDrop Redemption Center in Medford, Ore. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting

For passionate football fans, it's not just bragging rights on the line Sunday: Waistlines are too. Research suggests whether your team wins or loses can alter how you perceive the taste of food, and how much you eat, even the day after. Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr hide caption

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Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr

Soda bottles displayed in a San Francisco market.A federal appeals court blocked a city law requiring advertisement warnings on the potential health impacts of sugary drinks. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Bassam Ghraoui, who ran Syria's most famous chocolate factory, left for Hungary when war consumed his home country. He successfully rebuilt his business in Budapest. The company still uses ingredients from Syria. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

A Syrian Chocolatier's Legend Lives On In Europe — But Stays Close To Its Roots

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Apsara Bharati is watching over her field in Nepal, where she and her neighbors are using the system of rice intensification to plant seedlings. Danielle Preiss/NPR hide caption

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Danielle Preiss/NPR

Nepalese Rice Farmers Boost Yields By Sowing Fewer Plants And Cutting Water

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Members of the Appalachian Beekeeping Collective inspect one of their apiaries. The collective teaches displaced coal miners in West Virginia how to keep bees as a way to supplement their income. Courtesy of Kevin Johnson hide caption

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Courtesy of Kevin Johnson

SweetHearts will be tougher to find this Valentine's Day. The company that used to make the popular candy went out of business. Its new owners aren't ready to start making new batches yet. Chitose Suzuki/AP hide caption

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Chitose Suzuki/AP

Be Mine? Nope. SweetHeart Candies Hard To Find This Valentine's Day

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Edward Huang (right) stands by a sign with his restaurant's name, Zai Lai, as (from left) Greg Ferguson and Skilynn Santiago prepare a customer's order in New York City. The name is inspired by the Mandarin phrase relatives in Taiwan often say when Huang leaves after a visit — zai lai, or "come again." Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Chinese, Taiwanese Restaurants Drop 'Golden' And 'Dragon' To Take On Mandarin Names

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Atsuo Sakurai stirs a fresh batch of Arizona Sake at his home brewery. Heather Sakurai/NPR hide caption

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Heather Sakurai/NPR

Brewing In The Desert: Sake Finds An Unlikely Home In Arizona

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To help protect the planet and promote good health, people should eat less than 1 ounce of red meat a day and limit poultry and milk, too. That's according to a new report from some of the top names in nutrition science. People should instead consume more nuts, fruits and vegetables, legumes, and whole grains, the report says. The strict recommended limits on meat are getting pushback. Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61 hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images/Westend61

These squash on sale at an Illinois grocery store have been genetically modified to resist a specific virus. Jonathan Ahl/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Jonathan Ahl/Harvest Public Media

Shoppers say they want simpler information to help them figure out which foods are healthy. But a one-size-fits-all solution may not work. asiseeit/Getty Images hide caption

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asiseeit/Getty Images

Slow carbs like whole-grain breads and pastas, oats and brown rice are rich in fiber and take more time to digest, so they don't lead to the same quick rise in blood sugar that refined carbs can cause. fcafotodigital/Getty Images hide caption

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You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

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The key to making the quintessential biscuit of the American South, like these from Callie's Charleston Biscuits Bakery in Charleston, S.C., is more about technique than a specific flour, some bakers say. Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Flashnick/The Washington Post/Getty Images