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Lebanese doctors take part in anti-government demonstrations in Beirut in November. Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Baz/AFP via Getty Images

Amid Lebanon's Economic Crisis, The Country's Health Care System Is Ailing

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A reproduction of a combo of two pictures of Qassim al-Rimi, leader of al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, who was killed in a U.S. counterterrorism operation. Yemeni Ministry of Interior/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yemeni Ministry of Interior/AFP via Getty Images

European Union foreign policy chief Josep Borrell, shown here during a news conference earlier this month, has expressed concerns about the Trump administration's proposal about how to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Francisco Seco/AP hide caption

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Francisco Seco/AP

Iranian judiciary spokesman Gholamhossein Esmaili says that an Iranian man named Amir Rahimpour will be executed for spying on behalf of the CIA and that the sentence and would be carried out soon. Hamed Ataei/Mizan News Agency via AP hide caption

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Hamed Ataei/Mizan News Agency via AP

A Turkish military convoy passes through the Syrian town of Dana, in Idlib province near the Turkish-Syrian border, on Sunday. It is there, in northwestern Syria, that friction between the country and neighboring Turkey has flared into direct violence. Aaref Watad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Aaref Watad/AFP via Getty Images

Orthodox Jewish women are increasingly joining a custom called Daf Yomi, Hebrew for "daily page," which involves reading a page a day of the Talmud, a centuries-old, multivolume collection of rabbinic teachings, debates and interpretations of Judaism. Here women read the last pages of the cycle at their first women's mass Talmud celebration in Jerusalem in January. Tanya Habjouqa/NOOR for NPR hide caption

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Tanya Habjouqa/NOOR for NPR

Orthodox Jewish Women Take A New Lead In Talmud Study In Israel

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Mohammed Tawfiq Allawi, photographed in 2012, was named Iraq's next prime minister. Following his appointment on Saturday, Allawi made a show of support with the anti-government protest movement. Prashant Rao /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Prashant Rao /AFP via Getty Images

President Donald Trump applauds as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks during Tuesday's announcement of the Trump administration's plan to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The Iranian missile strikes earlier this month caused extensive damage at the Ain al-Asad air base, northwest of Baghdad. President Trump said immediately after the attack that there was "only minimum damage." Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images

Palestinian demonstrators in Rafah, in the southern Gaza strip, hold portraits of President Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a protest against Trump's announcement of a peace plan on Tuesday. Said Khatib/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Said Khatib/AFP via Getty Images

Mortars hit a restaurant in the U.S. Embassy compound in Baghdad's Green Zone on Sunday night, according to Iraqi officials. The embassy is seen here earlier this month. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

Mortar Attack Damages Part of U.S. Embassy Compound In Baghdad

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Volunteer medics clear the ruins of a medical tent near Tahrir Square in Baghdad on Saturday after security forces stormed the area. They said security forces set the tent on fire, burning everything in it, including medical supplies. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Damage at the al-Asad military base in Iraq, days after a missile attack by Iran. The barrage was in retaliation for the U.S. killing of a top Iranian general in a drone strike in Baghdad on Jan. 3. Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ayman Henna/AFP via Getty Images

A worker piles boxes of strawberries inside the Ground Berries Association in northern Gaza. An unwritten deal between Israel and Hamas gives Gaza residents more access to jobs, trade and travel. Loay Ayyoub for NPR hide caption

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Loay Ayyoub for NPR

'Like A Prisoner Being Let Free': Israel-Hamas Truce Lends Hope To Gaza's Jobless

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An Iraqi protester grabs a tear gas canister fired by riot police amid clashes following a demonstration east of Tahrir Square, on Monday. Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images

'We Are Not Going To Leave': Iraq's Protests Escalate

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The phone of Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO and owner of The Washington Post, reportedly was hacked via a WhatsApp account owned by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

U.N. Urges Probe Of Reported Hacking Of Jeff Bezos' Phone By Saudi Arabia

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People hold posters showing the portrait of Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani at a protest outside the U.S. Consulate on Jan. 5 in Istanbul, Turkey. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Experts say Iran may retaliate for the killing of Qassem Soleimani, its top military leader, with cyberattacks on American companies. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

Iran Conflict Could Shift To Cyberspace, Experts Warn

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U.S. troops clear debris following an Iranian missile strike at the Ain al-Assad air base in Iraq on Jan. 8. No one was killed, and U.S. officials initially said no American service members had been injured. Ali Abdul Hassan/AP hide caption

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Ali Abdul Hassan/AP

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei's speech came after a period that saw mass public support after the death of a Iranian general and outrage over the downing of a commercial airliner. Official Khamenei website via Reuters hide caption

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Official Khamenei website via Reuters

Iran's Ayatollah Slams 'American Clowns' In Rare Friday Prayers Sermon

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