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Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, shown here in January in Cairo, could stay in office until 2034 if constitutional amendments approved by parliament pass a popular referendum. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AP

Friends of Loujain al-Hathloul made a photo to parody a Vogue Arabia cover image showing a Saudi princess in a red convertible. Pictured here (left to right) are Ayendri Ishani Ridell, Urooba Jamal, Narissa Diwan, Atiya Jaffar and Rauza Khan. Hathloul "took a huge risk to advance women's rights in her country," Jamal says, "and now is facing the most heinous injustices." Doaa Jamal hide caption

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Doaa Jamal

Concern Grows For Loujain Al-Hathloul, Jailed Saudi Women's Driving Activist

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Emirates' inaugural A380 flight to San Francisco International Airport approaches the gate in 2014. Airbus announced Thursday it is stopping production of the A380 in 2021 after Emirates canceled dozens of orders. Tony Avelar/AP Images for Emirates hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP Images for Emirates

Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei met with a group of the air force staff in Tehran on Friday. An American woman has been charged with allegedly spying for Iran. AP hide caption

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AP

Ex-Air Force Counterintelligence Agent Charged With Giving Secrets To Iran

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The Absher app, available in the Apple and Google apps stores in Saudi Arabia, allows men to track the whereabouts of their wives and daughters. Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Apple App Store/Screenshot by NPR

Civilians who have fled fighting in Bagouz wait to board trucks after being screened by members of the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) at a makeshift screening point in the desert on Saturday in Bagouz, Syria. After weeks of fighting the SDF announced the start of a final operation to oust ISIS from the last village held by the extremist group. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

In remarks at the U.S. Institute of Peace on Friday, Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad said a "long agenda" of issues need to be resolved before a peace deal can be finalized. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

British photojournalist John Cantlie is seen in this video image released in December 2016 in what appeared to be central Mosul, Iraq. He was abducted by the Islamic State in 2012. Islamic State's Amaq News Agency via AP hide caption

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Islamic State's Amaq News Agency via AP

Pope Francis celebrates Mass on Tuesday at Zayed Sports City in Abu Dhabi. His three-day trip to the United Arab Emirates marks the first time a pontiff has ever visited the Arabian Peninsula. Francois Nel/Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Nel/Getty Images

Axel Hirschfeld looks at the remains of dead birds while holding a Levant sparrowhawk. The bird was found locked in a small enclosure without food or water in a field used by poachers in the town of Ras Baalbek, Lebanon, in September. Sam Tarling for NPR hide caption

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Sam Tarling for NPR

A boy holds the burqa of his mother as they walk down a street in the old city of Kabul on November 1, 2009. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

Opinion: As U.S. Seeks To Withdraw Troops, What About Afghanistan's Women?

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Mourners transport the flag-draped coffin of Iraqi archaeologist Lamia al-Gailani, seen in the poster, for burial during her funeral procession in the National Museum in Baghdad on Jan. 21. Iraq is mourning the loss of a beloved archaeologist who helped rebuild her country's leading museum in the aftermath of the U.S. invasion in 2003. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Khalid Mohammed/AP

Palestinian security forces gather in front of the Palestinian Legislative Council building in Ramallah in the Israeli-occupied West Bank in December. Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images

A U.S. court has ordered the Syrian government to pay $300 million for killing American journalist Marie Colvin in 2012. Colvin is seen here in London in 2010. Arthur Edwards/ WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Arthur Edwards/ WPA Pool/Getty Images

A construction worker saws steel rods at the site of a school that was funded by the United States Agency for International Development in the Palestinian village of al-Jabaa, in the West Bank, on Jan. 22. Hazem Bader/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hazem Bader/AFP/Getty Images

Mahmud, 11, Ayyub, 7, and their mother, Felicia Perkins-Ferreira, walk toward the boat that will take them out of Syria, across the river to Iraq, so they can start their journey home to Trinidad. Ruth Sherlock/NPR hide caption

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Ruth Sherlock/NPR

Trinidadian Mom Reunites With Kids Taken By Their Father To ISIS

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