Africa Africa

Africa

Babies in their cribs at Lambano Sanctuary, a hospice for orphaned children with HIV in Gauteng, South Africa. Andrew Aitchison/Pictures Ltd./Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Aitchison/Pictures Ltd./Corbis/Getty Images

A World Health Organization medic prepares a vaccination dose for a front-line aid worker earlier this year in the small town of Mangina, Democratic Republic of Congo. Four Ebola response workers were killed and six others injured in two attacks overnight — one in Mangina and the other in Biakato Mines. Al-hadji Kudra Maliro/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Al-hadji Kudra Maliro/AP

French Defense Minister Florence Parly (left) and French Army Chief of Staff Gen. François Lecointre said Tuesday that two helicopters collided in midair and killed 13 French soldiers fighting Islamic extremists in Mali. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Thibault Camus/AP

Ronald Mutyaba, an auto mechanic, at his home in Kampala, Uganda. Mutyaba is HIV positive and has developed Karposi sarcoma, a type of cancer that often affects people with immune deficiencies. He is holding a bottle of the liquid morphine that nurses from the nonprofit group Hospice Africa have prescribed to help control the pain caused by his illlness. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Nurith Aizenman/NPR

A Sip Of Morphine: Uganda's Old-School Solution To A Shortage Of Painkillers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/778798039/784670100" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An employee walks past a power plant's electricity pylons in Lagos, Nigeria. Power shortages are particularly a problem for Nigeria's booming tech industry, which accounts for nearly 14% of the country's GDP. Georgie Osodi/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Georgie Osodi/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Musician and opposition candidate Bobi Wine holds a press conference, encouraging his "people power" supporters to continue wearing their trademark red berets in Kampala after the military banned them. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

toggle caption
SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty

Bobi Wine Vs. Uganda's 'Dictator': It's 'Dangerous To Sit Down And Resign To Fate'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/780067936/780067937" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rosine Mbakam, left, says she chose to shoot all images and sound herself to maintain an equal relationship with the subjects of her films. Icarus Films hide caption

toggle caption
Icarus Films

Bosco Ntaganda, the former Congolese militia leader known as "Terminator," awaits his verdict Thursday in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Netherlands. The warlord would ultimately be sentenced to 30 years in jail for war crimes in the early 2000s. Peter Dejong/ANP/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Dejong/ANP/AFP via Getty Images

Fatou "Toufah" Jallow says she was raped by former Gambian president Yahya Jammeh. She now lives in Canada but returned home to testify before the nation's Truth Commission. 2019 Human Rights Watch hide caption

toggle caption
2019 Human Rights Watch

Beauty Queen's Rape Allegation Against Former Gambia President Sparks #MeToo Movement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/775480089/776173395" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe first encountered Ebola in 1976, before it had been identified. Since then, from his post at the Congo National Institute for Biomedical Research, he has led the global search for a cure. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Samantha Reinders for NPR

This Congolese Doctor Discovered Ebola But Never Got Credit For It — Until Now

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/774863495/776968362" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nesma (left) and Anys are Algerian siblings who came out to each other at a party. They live in Paris, and both identify as queer. "It now makes us stronger and committed together for the queer and Algerian causes," Anys says. Mikael Chukwuma Owunna hide caption

toggle caption
Mikael Chukwuma Owunna

Elephants approach a road at Liwonde. Reid says the park hasn't lost a single high-value animal in 30 months. Thoko Chikondi for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Thoko Chikondi for NPR

49-Minute Listen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/760487476/773372554" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A health worker gives the oral polio vaccine to a child in Karachi, Pakistan. Fareed Khan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Fareed Khan/AP

Ghost Viruses And The Taliban Stand In The Way Of Wiping Out Polio

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/773134840/773148981" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, seen addressing lawmakers Tuesday, won a Nobel Peace Prize less than two weeks ago — but he now appears embroiled in a standoff with the activist who helped bring down the regime before him. Mulugeta Ayene/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mulugeta Ayene/AP

Nabia Drammeh, 27, a nurse, talks with Maram Ceesay, and her granddaughter, Awa at the Brufut Minor Health Center outside of Banjul, the capital of the Gambia. Awa's mother passed away during childbirth leaving Maram to look after her. The 2-year-old is being treated for pneumonia. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Samantha Reinders for NPR

Fighting Pain Without Opioids: How One Nurse In The Gambia Does It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/764764473/772368943" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A blood transfusion bag hangs in an operating room in a hospital in the Republic of Congo. Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa have a huge gap between blood supply and demand, new research found. Godong/Universal Images Group/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Godong/Universal Images Group/Getty Images