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Robert Davis' experience exiting parole has been a difficult process. He seemed to be doing everything correctly, but a miscommunication between the U.S. Parole Commission and his parole officers delayed his release from supervision. Nate Palmer for NPR hide caption

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Nate Palmer for NPR

After prison he followed the rules, but a parole mishap delayed his full freedom

Robert Davis' experience with the U.S. Parole Commission is an example of how systemic barriers can hold down people striving to do the right thing.

After prison he followed the rules, but a parole mishap delayed his full freedom

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New York city municipal workers, including police officers and firefighters, rally on Monday against a vaccination mandate. City workers are required to get vaccinated against COVID-19 by Nov. 1 or risk losing their jobs. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

NYC firefighters are planning a protest at the mayor's home over vaccine rules

Firefighters and thousands of other city are protesting New York City's vaccine mandate. Public employees have to get the coronavirus vaccine by Nov. 1, or risk losing their job.

House Oversight Chairwoman Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., says oil companies who have said they are working to use greener technologies have also disseminated misinformation about climate change. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Oil executives will be pressed in Congress today on climate disinformation

House Oversight Chair Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., called the CEOs of four oil companies to appear and answer questions about climate change. She says the companies have spread misinformation for decades.

Then-Vice President Biden shakes hands with Pope Francis on Capitol Hill in Washington, prior to the pope's address to a joint meeting of Congress in 2015. On Friday, Francis will welcome Biden to the Vatican for the first time since Biden took office, becoming the second Catholic president in U.S. history. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Biden's meeting with Pope Francis will be both official and deeply personal

Biden is the second Catholic U.S. president, and his faith is central in his public image. The pastor at a D.C. church where the president worships tells NPR that Biden has felt supported by Francis.

Biden's meeting with Pope Francis will be both official and deeply personal

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Rugby player Tevita Bryce collapsed midway through a match in New Jersey and went into cardiac arrest. Quick thinking from bystanders and an AED on site may have saved his life. Jill Ferry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jill Ferry/Getty Images

A rugby player survived a mid-game heart attack with quick thinking from bystanders

Tevita Bryce may not have survived when he went into cardiac arrest in the middle of a rugby game last weekend. But with help from the opposing team and fans, he's now in recovery.

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

OK, so you're a 'Sellout.' Now what?

In his new book Sellout, writer Dan Ozzi traces a music industry in flux starting in the mid-90s, as punk bands cash in on their cred in exchange for rock stardom and asks, was it all worth it?

OK, so you're a 'Sellout.' Now what?

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People walk through Old San Juan in Puerto Rico in March as tourism on the island continues to surge. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Why the most vaccinated place in the U.S. might not be where you think

The highest rate of COVID-19 vaccination in the United States is not in a liberal-leaning Northeastern or West Coast state. It's in a place with a notably different political culture.

Why Puerto Rico leads the U.S. in COVID vaccine rate — and what states can learn

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Stacey Abrams speaks during a church service in Norfolk, Va., on Oct. 17. A political organization led by the Democrat is branching out into paying off medical debts. Fair Fight Action said it's donating $1.34 million from its political action committee to wipe out debt owed by 108,000 people in Georgia, Arizona, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

108,000 people will get medical debt relief after Stacey Abrams' PAC gifts $1.34M

The Fair Fight Political Action Committee says its donation to the RIP Medical Debt nonprofit will benefit residents in 5 Southern states, part of Fair Fight Action's advocacy for Medicaid expansion.

Neil Cavuto, pictured on the Fox Business Network in New York in March 2017. The Fox News Channel anchor urged viewers to get vaccinated after announcing his own breakthrough COVID-19 diagnosis. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Fox anchor Neil Cavuto urged viewers to get vaccinated. Then came the death threats

Cavuto, who is immunocompromised, encouraged viewers to get vaccinated against COVID-19 after announcing his own breakthrough infection. When he returned to the air, he brought their emails with him.

In September 1971, prisoners at Attica prison in update New York revolted in protest of inhumane living conditions. Showtime/Firelight hide caption

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Showtime/Firelight

How the Attica prison uprising started — and why it still resonates today

Fresh Air

A new documentary goes behind the walls of the deadly 1971 uprising. Attica filmmaker Stanley Nelson and former prisoner Arthur Harrison reflect on the five-day revolt, and its lasting legacy.

How the Attica prison uprising started — and why it still resonates today

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Manufacturers sold 203.7 billion cigarettes in 2020, up 0.4% from a year earlier, the Federal Trade Commission says. Esther Moreno Martinez / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Esther Moreno Martinez / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

After a steady decline, cigarette sales went up last year for the first time in two decades

The Federal Trade Commission says sales in 2020 were up slightly, and analysts say the increase was due to the coronavirus pandemic. But the gain looks unlikely to represent a long-term trend.

Tammy and Benny Alexie have been married for over 35 years. Until Hurricane Ida, they had lived in the same house in Barataria, La. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Benny watched his house drift away. Now, his community wants better storm protection

Residents of and around Jean Lafitte, La. say they haven't seen storm damage like this before. And they say the federal government could have done more for them as it did for the city upriver.

Benny watched his house drift away. Now, his community wants better storm protection

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Merck & Co. headquarters in Kenilworth, N.J. United Nations-backed Medicines Patent Pool reached an agreement with Merck and its partner Ridgeback Biotherapeutics allowing MPP to license the manufacture of molnupiravir to pharmaceutical companies across the globe. Christopher Occhicone/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Occhicone/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Merck will allow drugmakers in other countries to make its COVID-19 pill

The drug, known as molnupiravir, has shown promise in treating the disease. The agreement to license its production could help millions of people in the developing world gain access to it.

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