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Aerial photograph of the dominant fissure three erupting on the Northeast Rift Zone of Maunaloa, taken at approximately 8 a.m. HST Nov. 29, 2022. Fissure three fountains were up to 25 meters this morning and the vent was feeding the main lava flow to the northeast. M. Patrick/USGS hide caption

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M. Patrick/USGS

National

Maunaloa remains steady, while geologists encourage vigilance

Hawai‘i Public Radio

Lava is shooting up to 200-feet in the air as the Maunaloa eruption continues on Hawaiʻi Island. Currently, no homes or communities are threatened by the lava flows.

Protesters shout slogans during a protest against China's strict coronavirus measures on Monday in Beijing, China. Protesters took to the streets in multiple Chinese cities after a deadly apartment fire in Xinjiang province sparked a national outcry as many blamed COVID-19 restrictions for the deaths. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

China's lockdown protests and rising COVID leave Xi Jinping with '2 bad options'

Extraordinary street protests in some Chinese cities and campuses over the weekend put Xi Jinping's controversial approach to the pandemic under the spotlight.

Who is to blame for inflation? Some say greedy corporations are the culprits. (Photo by Peter Ruck/BIPs/Getty Images) Peter Ruck/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Ruck/Getty Images

The mystery of rising prices: Are greedy corporations to blame for inflation?

Inflation has been pushing prices up all year, but economists and politicians don't agree on where it's coming from.

The mystery of rising prices. Are greedy corporations to blame for inflation?

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A Boston Police Crime Scene Response vehicle is parked on the street outside an apartment building where infant and other human remains were discovered by authorities. Carlin Stiehl for The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Carlin Stiehl for The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Police find the remains of 4 infants inside a Boston apartment

Police say they discovered "what appeared to be a human fetus or infant" and additional remains at an apartment in South Boston. An autopsy has revealed four infants: two female and two male.

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Board members unanimously voted in favor of arming staff in the district. Kendall Crawford/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Kendall Crawford/Iowa Public Radio

An Iowa school district votes to arm staff

The Spirit Lake Community School District voted to authorize 10 staff members to be armed on campus. It's an effort to protect against a potential active shooter situation.

University of Pennsylvania Police Officer and K9 Uman, a black Labrador Retriever trained in explosives detection, conducting a package search during a routine training exercise. Wise K9 Photography hide caption

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Wise K9 Photography

Bomb-sniffing dogs are in short supply across the U.S.

The pandemic led to global supply snarls — including a shortage of dogs who detect explosives. One big reason is that the U.S. gets the vast majority of its dogs from other countries.

Bomb-sniffing dogs are in short supply across the U.S.

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Community members, including Walmart employees, gather for a candlelight vigil at Chesapeake City Park in Chesapeake, Va., on Monday for the six people killed at a Walmart in Chesapeake, Va. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

A survivor of the Virginia mass shooting files a $50 million lawsuit against Walmart

A Walmart employee who survived last week's mass shooting is suing the company for allegedly continuing to employ the shooter — a store supervisor — "who had known propensities for violence."

Nick Fuentes, center, greets supporters before speaking at a pro-Trump march on Nov. 14, 2020, in Washington. Fuentes, who has been labeled a white supremacist and anti-Semite by the Anti-Defamation League, sat down for dinner with former President Trump and Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, last week. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Republican leaders denounce Trump's dinner with white nationalist Nick Fuentes

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters that anyone meeting with people advocating that point of view "are highly unlikely to ever be elected president of the United States."

A Balenciaga retail store is seen closed to customers due to pandemic lockdowns in Melbourne, Australia in 2021. The brand has come under fire in recent weeks due to back-to-back ad scandals. Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images hide caption

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Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images

Balenciaga is suing the producers of its own ad campaign after facing backlash

The luxury fashion house is taking legal action against the production company North Six after back-to-back ad campaigns have left the luxury fashion house embroiled in controversy.

Ukrainian flags fly in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Oct. 19, marking the graves of soldiers killed in action following the Russian invasion earlier this year. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

A journalist's plea to the West: 'Pay attention to Ukraine and its fate'

Fresh Air

Invasion author Luke Harding began reporting from Ukraine in December 2021 and was in Kyiv the night before the Russian invasion began. "There is no mood inside Ukrainian society to yield," he says.

Annelise Capossela for NPR

Improv can build confidence. Here's how to apply it to your everyday life

Improv comedy is about more than making people laugh. It can help performers be more creative and self-assured — and combat anxiety, both on and off stage.

The rules of improv can make you funnier. They can also make you more confident.

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President Joe Biden meets with congressional leaders to discuss legislative priorities for the rest of the year on Tuesday at the White House in Washington. From left: House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Biden urges Congress to avert a rail strike

President Biden warned that congressional action was likely needed to avert a rail strike. His remarks came as bipartisan House and Senate leaders met to talk about legislative priorities.

People wait in line to vote early on Election Day 2020 in Tombstone, Ariz., in Cochise County. The county's Republican-led leadership has voted to delay certifying its 2022 election results, despite a state deadline on Monday. Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images

Counties in Arizona, Pennsylvania fail to certify election results by legal deadlines

Around 164,000 people's votes for the midterm elections are at risk after Arizona's Cochise County and Pennsylvania's Luzerne County failed to certify local results by their states' deadlines.

Law enforcement has used robots to investigate suspicious packages. Now, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors is considering a policy proposal that would allow SFPD's robots to use deadly force against a suspect. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

San Francisco considers allowing law enforcement robots to use lethal force

From sci-fi to the streets, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors is considering a policy proposal on whether or not the San Francisco Police Department has the authority to use robots as a deadly force.

San Francisco considers allowing law enforcement robots to use lethal force

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Actor Will Smith's success at the 94th Oscars was largely overshadowed by his behavior earlier in the ceremony, when he slapped comedian Chris Rock over a joke about Smith's wife's hair. In a new interview, Smith says that bottled up rage led to that moment. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

A teary Will Smith opens up to Trevor Noah about the 'rage' behind his Oscar slap

In his first big interview since March, the blockbuster actor said he "just lost it" over Rock's joke about his wife's hair. "That was a rage that had been bottled for a really long time," he said.

Kevin Davenport, an aquarist and coral biologist, feeds krill to growing corals in a warehouse for growing and rehabilitating coral populations in Orlando, Fla., on Sept. 13. Zack Wittman for NPR hide caption

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Zack Wittman for NPR

Here is what scientists are doing to save Florida's coral reef before it's too late

Florida's barrier reef has lost 95% of its coral over the last half-century. Researchers, activists and government agencies are working to restore the reefs and ensure their long-term survival.

Here is what scientists are doing to save Florida's coral reef before it's too late

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Nearly two years after the FDA issued a policy denouncing the marketing of fruit-flavored vape juice and other vape products to young people, the products are still widely available in stores. But experts hope that could be about to change. Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Helen H. Richardson/Denver Post via Getty Images

The chase is on: Regulators are slowly cracking down on vapes aimed at teens

The advent of vaping revived nicotine addiction among young people after a dramatic decline. The FDA seems poised to at last yank some products aimed at teens from the market. Will it work?

The northern long-eared bat is the third bat species recommended for endangered status this year due to white-nose syndrome. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources/AP hide caption

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Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources/AP

The northern long-eared bat, devastated by a fungus, is now listed as endangered

The Biden administration declared the northern long-eared bat endangered on Tuesday in a last-ditch effort to save a species driven to the brink of extinction by white-nose syndrome, a fungal disease.

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