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Left to right, former Vice President Joe Biden, Massuchusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete Buttigieg react on stage during the Democratic Presidential Debate at Otterbein University. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Michael McKinley (center), former senior adviser to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, arrives to testify at a closed-door deposition as part of the Democratic-led impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Carlos Jasso/Reuters hide caption

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Carlos Jasso/Reuters

The Department of Justice announced that hundreds of people have been charged in the takedown of a massive darknet child pornography website. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, along with 1,500 self-funded health plans, sued Sutter Health for antitrust violations. The closely watched case, which many expected to set precedents nationwide, ended in a settlement Wednesday. Above, Sutter Medical Center in Sacramento, Calif. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

The 30-year-old Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a self-described Democratic socialist who shares several policy priorities with the 78-year-old Sen. Bernie Sanders. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The UAW GM National Council will vote on a new tentative deal Thursday in a potential end to the national strike that has idled GM plants. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

In Hamburg, Germany, estimated life expectancy in the city's poorer neighborhoods still trails wealthier neighborhoods by 13 years. Juergen Sack/Getty Images hide caption

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Juergen Sack/Getty Images

Forest biologist Patricia Maloney is raising 10,000 sugar pine seedlings descended from trees that survived California's historic drought. Lauren Sommer/KQED hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/KQED

Alex, at 4 years and 11 months old, throws a toy football. Caroline Cheung-Yiu hide caption

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Caroline Cheung-Yiu

A Boy's Mysterious Illness Leads His Family On A Diagnostic Odyssey

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Bathrooms remain a key issue for employers and for co-workers who don't feel comfortable sharing bathrooms with transgender people, says Mark Marsen, a human resources director. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

He, She, They: Workplaces Adjust As Gender Identity Norms Change

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Goldfish, like these showcased at Tokyo's Nihonbashi Art Aquarium, have been bred in China over centuries, into forms so varied and rare that one can be worth hundreds of dollars. Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toshifumi Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

The Goldfish Tariff: Fancy Pet Fish Among The Stranger Casualties Of The Trade War

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Companies are increasingly concerned about how Earth's changing climate might affect their businesses, such as crop failures from drought, heat and storms. Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte/picture alliance via Getty Image

As The Climate Warms, Companies Scramble To Calculate The Risk To Their Profits

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A wall inside the CIA headquarters honors members of the CIA who died in the service of their country. Larry Downing/Sygma via Getty Images hide caption

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Larry Downing/Sygma via Getty Images

The War On Terrorism, Through The Eyes Of 3 Women At The CIA

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Donny Chan reads in his apartment, one of a growing number of tiny, upscale units known as "microflats," in Hong Kong. The apartments, dubbed "mosquito-size units" or "gnat flats" in Chinese, are drawing online ridicule and underscore worries over the Asian financial hub's overheated real estate market and widening inequality. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, center, arrives amid protests as she prepares to deliver her policies at the chamber of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong, on Wednesday. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP