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As hospitals consider how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting care, maternity wards across the country are changing policies on deliveries and visitors. Jasper Jacobs/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jasper Jacobs/AFP via Getty Images

Pregnant Women Worry About Pandemic's Impact On Labor, Delivery And Babies

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An empty parking lot surrounds the Macy's at the Roosevelt Field Mall on March 20 in East Garden City, N.Y. The retail chain had previously announced plans to close about 125 stores over the next three years. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

The U.S. Navy hospital ship Comfort is welcomed to New York City by Charlene Nickloan, waving a flag from the Matthew Buono war memorial in Staten Island, N.Y., on Monday. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

A man donates food to an elderly woman during a government-imposed nationwide lockdown as a preventive measure against the new coronavirus in Islamabad on Sunday. Farooq Naeem/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Farooq Naeem/AFP via Getty Images

The International Olympic Committee has set firm dates for the delayed Tokyo 2020 Olympics, which are now set to start in July 2021. Here, a man walks past a banner promoting the Tokyo 2020 Olympics on Sunday, after a late-season snow in Tokyo. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

As a large number of companies opt to work from home, cybersecurity experts say it's a hacker's paradise. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Cybersecurity Lawyer Who Flagged The WHO Hack Warns Of 'Massive' Remote Work Risks

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President Trump on Sunday described models showing U.S. coronavirus cases could peak in two weeks — at Easter — a time when he had hoped things would be back to normal for parts of the country. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

How 15 Days Became 45: Trump Extends Guidelines To Slow Coronavirus

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President Trump listens as Dr. Deborah Birx, White House coronavirus response coordinator, speaks during a coronavirus task force briefing in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sunday. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Universities across the U.S. are gearing up to run coronavirus tests, much like the virology lab at UW Medicine, which includes the University of Washington's medical school and hospitals, started doing early on in the outbreak. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

In Manhattan, a makeshift morgue is set up next to Lenox Health Greenwich Village. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

The coronavirus pandemic is forcing the U.S. Census Bureau to suspend for two more weeks the hiring of 2020 census workers and in-person visits in remote communities and areas recovering from natural disasters. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images