Health Health

Health

Julio Francisco waits for people to show up wanting a COVID-19 test on January 13, 2022 in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Omicron Wave Is Receding. What Happens Now?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1075776824/1076526028" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A student washes her hands before entering a classroom at a school in Blantyre, Malawi, in March 2021. Top scientists say that many African countries, including Malawi, appear to have already arrived at a substantially less threatening stage of the coronavirus pandemic. Joseph Mizere/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joseph Mizere/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Africa may have reached the pandemic's holy grail

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1072591923/1076239268" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A health worker wearing protective clothing shows people lining up at a testing center in Beijing, China. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

A computer-generated image of the omicron variant of the coronavirus. Uma Shankar Sharma/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Uma Shankar Sharma/Getty Images

A second version of omicron is spreading. Here's why scientists are on alert

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1076123109/1076123244" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Workers who suffer miscarriages may face repercussions if they try to take a lot of time off at work. There are no national laws that mandate sick leave for workers, let alone specific protections for people dealing with a miscarriage. Catherine McQueen/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Catherine McQueen/Getty Images

A glass is filled in with water on April 27, 2014 in Paris. Scientists studying what makes us thirsty have found the body checks in on our water consumption in several different ways. FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
FRANCK FIFE/AFP via Getty Images

Thirsty? Here's how your brain answers that question

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1076089390/1076094745" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People shop in The Galleria mall in Houston during Black Friday on Nov. 26, 2021. The economy grew strongly last year but at an uneven pace because of the pandemic. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Believe it or not, the economy grew last year at the fastest pace since 1984

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1075782151/1076247794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Peloton is a fitness and media company that makes stationary bikes, treadmills and workout videos. Peloton hide caption

toggle caption
Peloton

This family photo shows D.J. Ferguson initially being treated at Milford, Mass., Regional Medical Center. Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston is defending itself after Ferguson's family claimed he was denied a new heart for refusing to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Tracey Ferguson file photo/via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Tracey Ferguson file photo/via AP

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell listens during his renomination hearing with the Senate Banking Committee on Jan. 11. The Fed is planning to become more aggressive in fighting inflation. Graeme Jennings/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Graeme Jennings/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Game time: The Fed unveils a tougher plan to fight stubbornly high inflation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1075598074/1075881094" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brothers Chase Miller (left), 10, and Carson Miller, 11, in November 2021. The two brothers have a rare genetic disorder and are immunocompromised. Their family has to practice extreme caution to prevent coronavirus exposures. Danny Miller hide caption

toggle caption
Danny Miller

There's one population that gets overlooked by an 'everyone will get COVID' mentality

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1075549754/1075881082" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript