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Health

Some people land in the hospital over and over. Although research suggests that giving those patients extra follow-up care from nurses and social workers won't reduce those extra hospital visits, some hospitals say the approach still saves them money in the long run. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Hospital staff wash the emergency entrance of Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where patients infected with a new virus are being treated, in Wuhan, China, on Wednesday. Dake Kang/AP hide caption

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Dake Kang/AP

H5N1 bird flu virus is the sort of virus under discussion this week in Bethesda, Md. How animal viruses can acquire the ability to jump into humans and quickly move from person to person is exactly the question that some researchers are trying to answer by manipulating pathogens in the lab. SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?

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Maria Fabrizio for WPLN

Patients Want To Die At Home, But Home Hospice Care Can Be Tough On Families

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Abortion-rights supporters demonstrate last May in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. A high court decision in a case that could curtail or even overturn Roe v. Wade is set for opening arguments in March. Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Generics may not have the same cost-lowering power for specialty medicines, such as multiple sclerosis drugs, researchers find. That's true especially when other brand-name drugs are approved to treat a given disease before the first generic is approved. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

When Heather Woock was conceived, her mom sought the help of a fertility specialist. What happened next was not what she was led to believe. But it took three decades for it to come to light. Leah Klafczynski for NPR hide caption

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Leah Klafczynski for NPR

Her Own Birth Was 'Fertility Fraud' And Now She Needs Fertility Treatment

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The Supreme Court will examine Trump administration regulations that allow employers to claim exemptions to the contraceptive insurance coverage mandate in the Affordable Care Act. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rep. Ayanna Pressley appears in a video for The Root, the African American-focused online magazine, in which she reveals her bald head and talks about living with alopecia. Courtesy of The Root and G/O Media via AP hide caption

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Courtesy of The Root and G/O Media via AP

Sepsis arises when the body overreacts to an infection, and blood vessels throughout the body become leaky. Researchers now estimate that about 11 million people worldwide died with sepsis in 2017 alone — that's about 20% of all deaths. Medic Image/Universal Images Gr/Getty Images hide caption

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Medic Image/Universal Images Gr/Getty Images

Stealth Disease Likely To Blame For 20% Of Worldwide Deaths

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The mouse on the right has been engineered to have four times the muscle mass of a normal lab mouse. Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One hide caption

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Se-Jin Lee/PLOS One

Scientists Sent Mighty Mice To Space To Improve Treatments Back On Earth

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Teri Hines says she had a bout of depression during the lead up to menopause in her mid-40s. For many women, the lead-up to menopause can trigger mood issues. Hannah Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Hannah Yoon for NPR

As Menopause Nears, Be Aware It Can Trigger Depression And Anxiety, Too

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Quitting smoking isn't easy, and while gum or a fidgeting device may not be a silver bullet, cravings can be linked to your daily routine. Thinking of a substitute behavior to use when a craving strikes is one tool that could help you quit. Andee Tagle and Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Andee Tagle and Becky Harlan/NPR

How To Quit Smoking, With Help From Science

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