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After the CDC shifted this week to less restrictive mask guidance for people who have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, some leaders in the public health world felt blindsided. While some people rejoiced, others say they feel the change has come too soon. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Baseball fans sit at their seats without masks prior to a baseball game between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Miami Marlins on Thursday in Phoenix. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

How To 'Human' Again: Advice For The Long Transition To Post-Pandemic Life

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Left: A drawing of a human with a cow head holding a needle menacingly toward a child as he administers a tainted smallpox vaccination was meant to sow distrust of smallpox vaccines. Right: Protesters against COVID-19 vaccinations hold a rally in Sydney in February. Bettman/Getty Images; Brook Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettman/Getty Images; Brook Mitchell/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says fully vaccinated adults don't need to wear masks in most situations. Some states responded cautiously and have yet to implement those new guidelines, while others have. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Gaylord High School principal Chris Hodges measures the space between seats in a yearbook class. A student in the class tested positive for covid, and Hodges is working with the local health department to trace people who might have been exposed to her at school. Brett Dahlberg/WCMU hide caption

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Brett Dahlberg/WCMU

A Principal And His Tape Measure: Schools Are Helping Do COVID-19 Contact Tracing

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The CDC's new guidelines on face coverings and social distancing are raising questions about grocery store requirements moving forward. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A woman walks past posters explaining mask requirements at Grand Central Terminal train station in New York City on Wednesday. Rules requiring masks on transit are unchanged by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's updated mask guidance for fully vaccinated people. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

The majority of anti-vaccine claims on social media trace back to a small number of influential figures, according to researchers. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Just 12 People Are Behind Most Vaccine Hoaxes On Social Media, Research Shows

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How Do You Get People To Get A Vaccine?

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Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, at this year's State of the State address in Jefferson City, Mo., when he declared he would "uphold the will of the voters" in expanding Medicaid. He reversed course on Thursday. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP
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Painful Endometriosis Could Hold Clues To Tissue Regeneration, Scientist Says

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President Biden arrives with Vice President Harris to discuss the CDC's new mask guidance in the Rose Garden of the White House on Thursday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

A 16-year-old gets a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in Anaheim, Calif., on April 28. Advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now say it's not necessary for adolescents to wait two weeks after a COVID shot to receive routine immunizations. Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Adolescents Can Get Routine Immunizations With Their COVID Shots, CDC Advisers Say

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A light micrograph of a mature sporangium of a mucor fungus. India is seeing a rise in cases of mucormycosis, a rare but dangerous fungal infection. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Many of the changes in health care that happened during the pandemic are likely here to stay, such as conferring with doctors online more frequently about medication and other treatments. d3sign/Getty Images hide caption

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