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Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has vowed to launch an investigation into whether officials at the Justice Department and the FBI were plotting a "bureaucratic coup" to oust President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Chico Housing Action Team organizers Leslie Johnson, left, Charles Withuhn, center, and Bill Kurnizki, right, in the field in south Chico where they plan to soon break ground on a 33-unit tiny home community for homeless adults called Simplicity Village. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

Tiny Homes For Homeless Get The Go-Ahead In The Wake of California's Worst Wildfire

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President Trump speaks in the Rose Garden at the White House on Friday to declare a national emergency in order to build a wall along the southern border. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

The Annie Merner Pfeiffer Chapel is seen on the campus of Bennett College in Greensboro, N.C. The college, one of two historically black colleges for women, is fighting to maintain its accreditation. Bennett College hide caption

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Bennett College

Facing Loss Of Accreditation Over Finances, Women's HBCU Raises Millions

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Former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke left the Trump administration amid unresolved ethics investigations. His department has been inundated by Freedom of Information requests and is now proposing a new rule which critics charge could limit transparency. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Interior Dept.'s Push To Limit Public Records Requests Draws Criticism

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Tom and Tamara Conry stand outside their home in Paradise, Calif., which was almost untouched by November's deadly Camp Fire. Their property insurer notified them in December that it would not renew their policy past January. Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio

Their Home Survived The Camp Fire — But Their Insurance Did Not

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Survivor Maryland kicks off its 12th season with a challenge where participants' arms are tied to a plastic cup of water that's resting on the top of a ledge. One wrong move and the cup (and its contents) will tumble. Olivia Sun/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Sun/NPR

Department of State Spokesperson Heather Nauert withdrew herself from consideration for the nomination of U.S. ambassador to the U.N. on Saturday. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

A legal battle is expected to come down to one question: Is it constitutional for the president to ignore Congress' decision not to give him all the money he wants for a Southern border wall, like that at Tijuana, Mexico, and, instead get it by declaring a national emergency? Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Trump's National Emergency Sets Up Legal Fight Over Spending Authority

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Alexsis Rodgers, president of Virginia Young Democrats, is one of the disappointed constituents who worked hard to elect some of the officials at the center of the Virginia controversies. Now, Rodgers says, the state democratic party must develop diverse leaders before there's another crisis. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR