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Latin America

Hurricane Sam has not triggered any storm warnings or watches, but forecasters are keeping a close eye on the storm, with it predicted to reach major hurricane status on Saturday. NOAA/Esri/HERE/Garmin/Earthstar Geographics hide caption

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NOAA/Esri/HERE/Garmin/Earthstar Geographics

Haitian migrants cross the Rio Grande on Wednesday to get food and water in Mexico, as seen from Ciudad Acuña, Mexico. The U.S. is allowing some migrants to enter the country and sending others back to Haiti. Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images

How Haitian Migrants Are Getting To The U.S., And Where They May Go Next

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Different types of potatoes seed are seen displayed in "Parque de la Papa" or Potato Park, in Pisac, Peru. One hundred and fifty type of tubers from the Sacred Valley highlands are native to Peru. Martin Mejia/AP hide caption

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Martin Mejia/AP

Gloria Hernandez, 82, stands outside her home in Aliaga, a village in the Philippines, where she lives with her daughter and grandsons. During the pandemic, she has been struggling to afford fresh meat and fish. Xyza Cruz Bacani for NPR hide caption

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Xyza Cruz Bacani for NPR

A little girl and her baby brother were taken into custody by U.S. Border Patrol agents this week after they were discovered abandoned along the U.S.-Mexico border. U.S. Border Patrol hide caption

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U.S. Border Patrol

The chile en nogada — a stuffed poblano pepper covered in a walnut sauce — has become a classic Mexican dish. The version plated here comes from Ricardo Muñoz Zurita's Azul Condesa restaurant in Mexico City. Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Torres/AFP via Getty Images

For 200 Years, Chiles En Nogada Has Been An Iconic, And Patriotic, Mexican Meal

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In this Sept. 1992 file photo, Abimael Guzmán, the founder and leader of the Shining Path guerrilla movement, shouts inside of a jail cell after being captured in Lima, Peru. The Peruvian government reported Saturday that Guzman died after an illness. AP hide caption

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AP

Nicaraguan author Sergio Ramirez in 2017 upon receiving the Cervantes Prize literary award. Prosecutors have ordered Ramirez' arrest along with other opponents of President Daniel Ortega. Alfredo Zuniga/AP hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AP

A magnitude 7.1 earthquake shook Acapulco, Mexico, on Wednesday. After the quake, Mexicans shared videos of bursts of blue lights streaking across the sky. Raul Aguirre/Getty Images hide caption

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Raul Aguirre/Getty Images

A couple walks past a taxi cab that was damaged by falling debris after a strong earthquake in Acapulco, Mexico, on Tuesday. The quake struck southern Mexico near the resort of Acapulco, causing buildings to rock and sway in Mexico City nearly 200 miles away. Bernardino Hernandez/AP hide caption

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Bernardino Hernandez/AP
Photo illustration by LA Johnson/NPR

A pedestrian takes a photo of graffiti on a temporary metal barrier set up to protect the perimeter of the Christopher Columbus's statue which was removed last year by authorities on Paseo de la Reforma in Mexico City. Mayor Claudia Sheinbaum announced on Sunday that the statue will be replaced by a statue honoring Indigenous women. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Journalist and activist Gildo Garza, right, reads the names of murdered journalists at a demonstration outside the federal attorney general's office in Mexico City. Courtesy Gildo Garza hide caption

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Courtesy Gildo Garza

Mexico's Journalists Speak Truth To Power, And Lose Their Lives For It

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Rev. Jean Eddy Desravines, 61, of Sainte-Agnes Catholic Church near Les Cayes, Haiti, celebrates Mass on Sunday. The church sanctuary was destroyed in the 7.2 magnitude earthquake that struck earlier this month. Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

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Octavio Jones for NPR

Samantha Power, administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development, speaks during a joint press conference with Haitian officials at the Toussaint Louverture International Airport, in Port-Au-Prince on Thursday. Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

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Octavio Jones for NPR