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Cars pass destroyed Russian tanks from an earlier battle against Ukrainians in the village of Dmytrivka, close to Kyiv, Ukraine, on Monday. With Russian troops gone from the Kyiv region, life is returning to the city. But heavy fighting takes place daily in the east and the south of the country. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Three months of war: Russia underachieves, Ukraine overachieves

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People leave the aid camp at the Poland-Ukraine border in Medyka, Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

The flow of Ukrainian refugees has changed direction in Poland. And so has aid relief

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Russian Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin waits for the start of a court hearing in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Monday. Judges went on to sentence him to life in the first war crimes trial since Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

A Russian soldier is sentenced to life in prison in Ukraine's first war crimes trial

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Liev Schreiber co-founded the aid network BlueCheck Ukraine. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images hide caption

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Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

Liev Schreiber's family ties to Ukraine push him to help its people

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A view of the business tower Lakhta Centre, the headquarters of Russian gas monopoly Gazprom in St. Petersburg, Russia, on April 27. Russia has halted natural gas exports to neighboring Finland. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

Russian soldiers left graffiti in the school in Borodyanka, a town outside of Ukraine's capital Kyiv. Anya Kamenetz/NPR hide caption

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Anya Kamenetz/NPR

How a Ukrainian teacher helped students escape Russia's invasion, and still graduate

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Raise Grigorievna Dreama's daughters Malina (left) and Ramina (center) and her granddaughter Monica (right) sit in their room at a temporary Chisinau housing center for refugees, mostly hosting people from the Roma community and other minority groups from Ukraine, in April. Betsy Joles hide caption

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Betsy Joles

Russian-backed Donetsk militia fighters man "Gvozdika" (Carnation) self-propelled artillery vehicles to fire toward a Ukrainian army position outside Donetsk, in territory held by the separatist Donetsk government in eastern Ukraine, Friday. Fighting has intensified in the Donbas region this week. Alexei Alexandrov/AP hide caption

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Alexei Alexandrov/AP

Joe Biden listens to remarks by Finland's President Sauli Niinisto and Sweden's Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson at the White House this week. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Two versions of history collide as Finland and Sweden seek to join NATO

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Ukrainian servicemen from the Azovstal steel plant sit on a bus near a penal colony, in Olyonivka, in territory under the government of the Donetsk People's Republic, on Friday. AP hide caption

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AP

Russia aims to capitalize on controlling the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol

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Ukrainians wait in a miles-long jam full of trucks, buses and cars to cross to the border at Medyka, Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

Millions rushed to leave Ukraine. Now the queue to return home stretches for miles

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Students listen to a teacher during a lesson at Poland's Warsaw Ukrainian School, on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

They Fled The Most Traumatized Parts of Ukraine. Classrooms Are Offering Them Hope

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A woman walks through the Oleksiivska station in Kharkiv, Ukraine. Thousands of residents have been sheltering in the city's subway stations, but the mayor says it's safe to emerge now that Russian forces are retreating. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR