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Credit card balances were up last year, and interest rates have gone up, too. That can weigh on your finances in the event of a recession. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

A Personal Recession Toolkit

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New York state records show nearly half the state's 600-plus nursing homes hired real estate, management and staffing companies run or controlled by their owners, frequently paying them well above the cost of services. Meanwhile, in the pandemic's height, the federal government was giving the facilities hundreds of millions in fiscal relief. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump is suing Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward over Woodward's latest book, The Trump Tapes. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Audi Canada and Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images for Audi Canada and Scott Eisen/Getty Images

Humira, the injectable biologic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, now faces its first competition from one of several copycat "biosimilar" drugs expected to come to market this year. Some patients spend $70,000 a year on Humira. JB Reed/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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JB Reed/Bloomberg via Getty Images

These screenshots show deployed service members that Wove worked with to design engagement rings while they are away from home. The rings in the photos are replicas that the service members received so they would have a sense of what the actual ones would be like. Andrew Wolgemuth hide caption

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Andrew Wolgemuth

The TikTok app logo is pictured in Tokyo, Sept. 28, 2020. University of Wisconsin System officials said Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2023, that they will restrict the use of TikTok on system devices. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

While the world's population continues to grow overall, the rate of growth has slowed down. Mario Tama/Getty Images NA hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images NA

Could Migration Help Ease The World's Population Challenges?

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An undated photo provided by the Grants Pass Police Department shows Benjamin Obadiah Foster, who is wanted by authorities for attempted murder, kidnapping and assault. AP hide caption

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AP

An employee examines a vanadium flow battery stack in the Battery Reliability Test Laboratory at PNNL. Andrea Starr/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory hide caption

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Andrea Starr/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Congress tightens U.S. manufacturing rules after battery technology ends up in China

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A delivery rider picks up his customers' online order as residents line up outside a store to buy Lunar New Year desserts in Beijing, Jan. 17. China's economic growth fell to its second-lowest level in at least four decades last year under pressure from anti-virus controls and a real estate slump. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

With COVID lockdowns lifted, China says it's back in business. But it's not so easy

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LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - MARCH 23: Miniature bottles of Fireball Whisky on display during the 2022 Bar & Restaurant Expo and World Tea Conference + Expo at the Las Vegas Convention Center on March 23, 2022 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images for Nightclub & Bar Media Group) David Becker/Getty Images for Nightclub & Bar hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images for Nightclub & Bar

Indicators of the Week: tips, eggs and whisky

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NPR

Saying goodbye to Pikachu and Ash, plus how Pokémon changed media forever

It's the end of an era. After more than 25 years, The Pokémon Company is closing the book on the adventures of Ash Ketchum and Pikachu. To celebrate the cultural impact of this dynamic duo – and of the Pokémon franchise – Brittany Luse sits down with actor Sarah Natochenny, who's voiced Ash since 2006. Sarah talks about growing up with a character who stays 10 years old, and how fans have been the lifeblood of the show. Then, Brittany sits down with Dexter Thomas, VICE News correspondent and Japanese culture critic, and Daniel Dockery, author of Monster Kids: How Pokémon Taught a Generation to Catch Them All. They explore how Pokémon transformed gaming and children's TV in the U.S. and became one of the biggest media franchises in the world.

Saying goodbye to Pikachu and Ash, plus how Pokémon changed media forever

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Experts say migration could offset falling birth rates — if politics don't get in the way. Didier Pallages/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Didier Pallages/AFP via Getty Images

Migration could prevent a looming population crisis. But there are catches

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Smaller bottles of Fireball do not contain whiskey, but a blend of malt beverage, wine and additional flavors and colors. Customers are suing the company for fraud, alleging the packaging is misleading. U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois hide caption

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U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois
Paper Boat Creative/Getty Images

What's the deal with the platinum coin?

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