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A composite photo shows TV anchors Hamed Bahram (left) and Nesar Nabil wearing face masks while reading the news on TOLOnews, in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Sunday. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

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Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Workers remove the final New York City pay phone near Seventh Avenue and 50th Street in Midtown Manhattan on Monday. Despite the fanfare, there are still some pay phones standing in the city. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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The government program that contributed to the baby formula shortage

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A Combine harvesting machine reaps wheat in a field of the Hula valley near the town of Kiryat Shmona in the north of Israel on May 22, 2022. Wheat prices have soared in recent months, driven by the war in Ukraine and a crippling heat wave in India. Jalaa Marey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jalaa Marey/AFP via Getty Images

A federal appeals court found that a Florida law intended to punish social media platforms is an unconstitutional violation of the First Amendment, dealing a major victory to companies who had been accused by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, pictured on May 9, of discriminating against conservative thought. Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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Cathie Wood, chief executive officer and chief investment officer, Ark Invest speaks during the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills on May 2. Wood, a star investor who has attracted millions in social media, has had a rough year as many of her technology-focused investments have cratered. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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A view of the business tower Lakhta Centre, the headquarters of Russian gas monopoly Gazprom in St. Petersburg, Russia, on April 27. Russia has halted natural gas exports to neighboring Finland. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

The Chinese flag is visible behind razor wire at a housing compound in Yangisar, south of Kashgar, in China's western Xinjiang region. GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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GREG BAKER/AFP via Getty Images

How goods made with forced labor end up in your local American store

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Investing in mediocrity

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A woman takes a photo of Andy Warhol's 'Shot Sage Blue Marilyn' on April 29 during Christie's 20th and 21st Century Art press preview in New York City. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

After a report alleged SpaceX paid a flight attendant to settle a sexual misconduct case against Elon Musk, the tech billionaire called it a politically motivated attack. Musk is seen here in March, at a new Tesla factory in Germany. Christian Marquardt/Getty Images hide caption

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