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Investigations

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 6: Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as people try to storm the US Capitol on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Tensions Are Rising Among Jan. 6 Defendants In A D.C. Jail

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A new study provides the first evidence of its kind that silica dust is responsible for the rising tide of severe black lung disease, including among coal miners in Appalachia. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Then-President Donald Trump speaks to supporters near the White House on Jan. 6, 2021. Hundreds of Trump supporters later stormed the U.S. Capitol in an attempt to disrupt the certification of President Biden's victory. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Couy Griffin, a commissioner in Otero County, N.M., speaks to journalists as he leaves the federal court in Washington, D.C., on March 21, 2022. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

After 20 years of setbacks, the U.S. military court in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, is exploring the idea of settlement talks for the 9/11 detainees. If that happens, the defendants could plead guilty, serve life in prison and avoid the death penalty. Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images

Guantánamo prosecutors are exploring plea deals in 9/11 case after years of setbacks

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Courtney Gramm waited seven months to receive her nurse practitioner license in California. Nursing boards, meant as a safeguard, have become an obstacle, preventing qualified nurses from getting into the workforce for months when basic vetting should take only weeks. Alyssa Schukar for NPR hide caption

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Alyssa Schukar for NPR

Listen to a reporter roundtable of this story

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New York City officials announced the city will no longer take Social Security checks from children to pay for foster care. Gary Hershorn/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Hershorn/Getty Images

New York City will stop collecting Social Security money from children in foster care

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This sketch depicts Guy Wesley Reffitt (left) and his lawyer, William Welch, in federal court in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 28. A jury found Reffitt guilty on all counts for his participation in the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

In the first Jan. 6 trial, a jury found Capitol riot defendant Guy Reffitt guilty

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Ron Shehee had been at the federal prison complex in Lompoc, Calif., only a few months when the pandemic struck. Meron Menghistab for NPR hide caption

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Meron Menghistab for NPR

As COVID spread in federal prisons, many at-risk inmates tried and failed to get out

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This artist sketch depicts Judge Dabney Friedrich looking out from the bench during proceedings in the trial against Guy Wesley Reffitt, joined by his lawyer William Welch, top right, in federal court in Washington. Dana Verkourteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkourteren/AP

Jan. 6 riot defendant was 'tip of this mob's spear,' prosecutor tells jury

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Federal lawmakers are pushing for a "do-over" of a contract, awarded by the Interior Department, to a former administrator to review deaths at tribal jails. Nearly half of those deaths happened on his watch. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Cynthia Hughes, seen here wearing a "Due Process Denied" shirt, has become a regular on Steve Bannon's show, where she has described the Jan. 6 defendants as "political prisoners." On a recent episode, Hughes announced changes to the Patriot Freedom Project after receiving criticism. War Room/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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War Room/Screenshot by NPR

At least 19 men and women have died since 2016 in tribal detention centers overseen by the Interior Department's Bureau of Indian Affairs, including the Shiprock District Department of Corrections facility, according to an investigation by NPR and the Mountain West News Bureau. Sharon Chischilly for NPR hide caption

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Sharon Chischilly for NPR

Interior Department hires former top cop to review jail deaths on his watch

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A pro-Trump mob stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Now, a nonprofit group said it has raised around $900,000 for the alleged rioters, but some of their families are raising questions about how the money is being spent. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Experts see 'red flags' at nonprofit raising big money for Capitol riot defendants

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In the year since the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol, federal prosecutors have charged more than 700 people related to the attack. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

5 takeaways from the Capitol riot criminal cases, one year later

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Daisy Hohman was separated from her three children for 20 months when they were placed in foster care. When Hohman was reunited with her children, she received a bill of nearly $20,000 for foster care from her Minnesota county. Joseph Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Joseph Shapiro/NPR

States send kids to foster care and their parents the bill — often one too big to pay

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The degenerative brain condition CTE can be diagnosed only through autopsy. But there's a quiet population of everyday people afraid they have it — and they're turning to dubious treatments. Boston University CTE Center and Getty Images/Aaron Marin for NPR hide caption

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Boston University CTE Center and Getty Images/Aaron Marin for NPR

Everyday people fear they have CTE. A dubious market has sprung up to treat them.

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"I could be out next week without a place to live," Mary Hunt worried when an NPR reporter visited. Hunt doesn't own the piece of land, making Havenpark Communities free to tell her to get out. Elaine Cromie for NPR hide caption

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Elaine Cromie for NPR

How the government helps investors buy mobile home parks, raise rent and evict people

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Shemia Reese holds the racial covenant that was in place for her home in St. Louis, Mo. Michael B. Thomas for NPR hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas for NPR

Racial covenants, a relic of the past, are still on the books across the country

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Charlton Heston (left), then president of the NRA, meets with fellow leaders Wayne LaPierre (far right) and Jim Baker (center) on April 30, 1999, ahead of the NRA's annual meeting in Denver. Around the same time, leaders discussed how to respond to the shooting at Columbine High School in nearby Littleton, Colo. More than 20 years later, NPR has obtained secret recordings of those conversations. Kevin Moloney/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Moloney/Getty Images

A secret tape made after Columbine shows the NRA's evolution on school shootings

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Abdul Hadi Nejrabi, the deputy ambassador, is one of the few employees left at the Afghan Embassy. "We choose to serve the people," he says. "That's the reason we are here." Laura Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sullivan/NPR

In Washington, the last employees at the Afghan Embassy work until the lights go off

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