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Investigations

John Pierce has taken on more defendants related to the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection than any other lawyer. "I believe it's around 18," he told NPR in a recent interview, adding, "Don't hold me to it." Nam Y. Huh/Pool/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/Pool/AP

John Pierce Represents More Capitol Riot Defendants Than Anyone. Should He?

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Afghan evacuees sit on a bus at the U.S. air base in Ramstein, Germany, on Aug. 26. Ramstein Air Base, the largest U.S. Air Force base in Europe, has hosted thousands of Afghans. Armando Babani/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Armando Babani/AFP via Getty Images

What It's Like Inside The U.S. Processing Center Welcoming Thousands Of Afghans

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The National Rifle Association's annual meeting featuring thousands of supporters listening to high-profile speakers fueled its influence. But for the past two years, the crowds had to stay home. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The NRA Cancels Its Annual Meeting Again, Underscoring The Group's Uncertain Future

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Medics transport a man with COVID-19 symptoms to a hospital in Austin, Texas. More than 3 million people in the state have had COVID-19, but just 81,000 are listed in a central data set at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Millions Of People Are Missing From CDC COVID Data As States Fail To Report Cases

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When investigators discovered the hack on Microsoft Exchange servers in January, they thought it was about stealing emails. Now they believe China vacuumed up reams of information in a bid to develop better artificial intelligence, or AI. Matt Chinworth for NPR hide caption

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Matt Chinworth for NPR

China's Microsoft Hack May Have Had A Bigger Purpose Than Just Spying

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Marines transport a detainee in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, in 2002. Nearly 800 detainees have passed through the prison since it opened that year. Today, 39 men are still being held there. Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

The Taliban's Rise Is Complicating Biden's Efforts To Close Guantánamo's Prison

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Taliban fighters mobilize to control a crowd during a rally for Afghanistan's independence day in Kabul on Aug. 19. The Taliban seized control of the city this week, effectively capturing the country in a matter of weeks. Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The Afghan Army Collapsed In Days. Here Are The Reasons Why

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An information board shows people who are wanted by law enforcement on suspicion of assaulting federal officers at the U.S. Capitol during the Jan. 6 riot. Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images hide caption

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Yegor Aleyev/Tass via Getty Images

The FBI Keeps Using Clues From Volunteer Sleuths To Find The Jan. 6 Capitol Rioters

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Cruz Urias Beltran collapsed because of heat-related illness while working in a cornfield near Grand Island, Neb., in 2018. He is one of at least 384 workers who died from environmental heat exposure in the U.S. in the last decade, according to an investigation by Columbia Journalism Investigations and NPR. Walker Pickering for NPR hide caption

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Walker Pickering for NPR

Heat is killing workers in the U.S. — and there are no federal rules to protect them

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Alphonso David, the president of the Human Rights Campaign, has faced calls for his resignation over ties to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo's sexual harassment scandal. The Human Rights Campaign has launched an internal investigation. David has denied all wrongdoing. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP

In February 2020, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo was praised by the president of the Human Rights Campaign, Alphonso David. David previously served as a legal adviser to Cuomo. Now, critics on the political left and right are calling for both men to resign. Gary Gershoff/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Gershoff/Getty Images

Cuomo Scandal Entangles Leader Of Influential LGBTQ Advocacy Group

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NPR spoke to more than a dozen current and former employees of One Medical. They say the high-end medical company has fundamentally changed its focus, with increasing revenue and reducing costs taking center stage. DrAfter123/Getty Images hide caption

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DrAfter123/Getty Images

One Medical Employees Say Concierge Care Provider Is Putting Profits Over Patients

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Trump supporters breach security and storm inside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The woman in blue with her fist raised was later identified as Suzanne Ianni. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department Is Struggling To Bring Capitol Riot Cases To Trial: Here's Why

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A U.S. military guard tower stands on the perimeter of the detainee camp on September 16, 2010, in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. There are now 39 detainees remaining after the prisoner transfer on July 19, 2021. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Biden Administration Transfers First Detainee Out Of Guantánamo

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Police stand guard Thursday outside the residence of the late Haitian President Jovenel Moïse in Port-au-Prince after his assassination last week. Valerie Baeriswyl/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Baeriswyl/AFP via Getty Images

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors passed a motion to make sure foster youth who receive Social Security benefits have access to those checks. County Supervisor Hilda Solis, co-sponsor of the motion, said the new directive is a "game changer." Sarah Reingewirtz/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Reingewirtz/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Army Brig. Gen. Mark Martins, Guantánamo's chief prosecutor, addresses the media on Oct. 19, 2012, at the end of a week of pretrial hearings for the five alleged architects of the 9/11 attacks. Martins announced his retirement this week. Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Michelle Shephard/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Razor wire and a guard tower stands at a closed section of the U.S. prison at Guantánamo Bay on Oct. 22, 2016. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

What Might Happen To Guantánamo Now That U.S. Troops Are Leaving Afghanistan

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Alan Hostetter, seen here in May 2020, became a leading activist against coronavirus-related lockdown policies in Orange County, Calif. Hostetter, a former police chief and yoga instructor, is now facing conspiracy charges for his alleged role in the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Rightmire/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

What Led A Police Chief Turned Yoga Instructor To The Capitol Riot?

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The remains of a burned home from the Bobcat Fire in Juniper Hills, Calif., on Sept. 20, 2020. Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Francis Dairy examines the damage on the property near the home he shared with his wife, Brenda Dairy, in Gates, Ore. The home was destroyed by the Beachie Creek Fire in 2020. Krista Rossow for NPR hide caption

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Krista Rossow for NPR

As Western Wildfires Worsen, FEMA Is Denying Most People Who Ask For Help

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"My goal for this year ... was simple," Proud Boys Chairman Enrique Tarrio tells NPR. "Start getting more involved in local politics." Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Some Proud Boys Are Moving To Local Politics As Scrutiny Of Far-Right Group Ramps Up

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