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Yevhenia Podvoiska and Tatiana Kuznetsova, from left, both policewomen, steer and navigate a drone during class in Kyiv on Oct. 27. Students must learn to work in pairs: a pilot and a navigator. Julian Hayda/NPR hide caption

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Julian Hayda/NPR

Ukrainian women have started learning a crucial war skill: how to fly a drone

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Ukrainians walk through the unlit streets of the capital Kyiv on Thursday, a day after Russian airstrikes knocked out electricity, heating and water to much of the country. With Russian troops faring poorly on the battlefield, Russia has launched a widespread bombing campaign directed at civilian infrastructure in Ukraine. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Russia strikes, Ukraine repairs, in a battle to survive the winter

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Logging in the recently liberated areas West of Izium is dangerous and punishable by fines. Unexploded ordnance litters the ground. But some loggers take the risk for the opportunity to harvest and deliver the wood to people who need heat. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

How Russia is weaponizing the Ukrainian winter

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Jack Smith, seen in 2010 when he was the Justice Department's chief of the Public Integrity Section. Attorney General Merrick Garland named Smith a special counsel on Friday to oversee DOJ's criminal investigations involving former President Donald Trump. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

DOJ names Jack Smith as special counsel to oversee Trump criminal investigations

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Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia takes his seat ahead of a working lunch at the G20 Summit, Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2022, in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia. Leon Neal/AP hide caption

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Leon Neal/AP

Federal Bureau of Investigation Director Christopher Wray testifies before the House Homeland Security Committee on Tuesday. Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas and National Counterterrorism Center Director Christine Abizaid were also there to discuss threats to the U.S. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Members of the Polish police inspect the fields near the village of Przewodow, Poland, where an explosion killed two people Tuesday. Polish police department handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Polish police department handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Left: U.S. President Joe Biden takes questions from reporters after he delivered remarks in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, DC on Wednesday. Right: Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Grand Hall in Beijing while welcoming German Chancelor Olaf Scholz on Nov. 4. Left: Samuel Corum/Getty Images, Right: Kay Nietfeld/Pool/AFP hide caption

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Left: Samuel Corum/Getty Images, Right: Kay Nietfeld/Pool/AFP

An elderly woman walks in the southern Ukrainian village of Arkhanhelske, outside Kherson, on Nov. 3. The Russians occupied the village until recently. Now Ukrainian forces are moving into villages where the Russians left. The Russians said they completed their withdrawal from Kherson on Friday, marking a major victory for Ukraine. Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images

Russia retreats from Kherson. Why is the U.S. nudging Ukraine on peace talks?

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Ukrainian Armed Forces in a tank heading toward the Kherson front in Kherson region on Wednesday. Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

What Russia's announced pullout from Kherson means for the war in Ukraine

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Russian businessman Yevgeny Prigozhin is shown prior to a meeting of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, on Tuesday, July 4, 2017. Prigozhin, an entrepreneur known as "Putin's chef" because of his catering contracts with the Kremlin, has admitted he interfered in U.S. elections and says he will continue to do so. Sergei Ilnitsky/AP hide caption

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Sergei Ilnitsky/AP