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Cars pass destroyed Russian tanks from an earlier battle against Ukrainians in the village of Dmytrivka, close to Kyiv, Ukraine, on Monday. With Russian troops gone from the Kyiv region, life is returning to the city. But heavy fighting takes place daily in the east and the south of the country. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Three months of war: Russia underachieves, Ukraine overachieves

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Sailors are seen aboard the USS George Washington in Yokosuka, Japan, in 2011. The U.S. Navy has seen a spike in desertions, with numbers more than doubling from 2019 to 2021. Seaman Jacob D. Moore/U.S. Navy hide caption

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Seaman Jacob D. Moore/U.S. Navy

Russian-backed Donetsk militia fighters man "Gvozdika" (Carnation) self-propelled artillery vehicles to fire toward a Ukrainian army position outside Donetsk, in territory held by the separatist Donetsk government in eastern Ukraine, Friday. Fighting has intensified in the Donbas region this week. Alexei Alexandrov/AP hide caption

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Alexei Alexandrov/AP

Flowers, candles and mementoes are left at a makeshift memorial outside the Tops market on May 18, 2022 in Buffalo, New York. Police say the shooting that killed 10 and wounded three is being investigated as a racially motivated hate crime. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman wearing a face mask walks past a Huawei store temporarily closed due to coronavirus-related restrictions in Beijing, Thursday, May 12, 2022. China's leaders are struggling to reverse a deepening economic slump while keeping a "zero-COVID" strategy that has shut down Shanghai and other cities. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Boat captain Emosi Dawai looks at the super-yacht Amadea where it is docked at the Queens Wharf in Lautoka, Fiji, on April 13, 2022. The super-yacht that American authorities say is owned by a Russian oligarch previously sanctioned for alleged money laundering has been seized by law enforcement in Fiji, the U.S. Justice Department announced May 5. Leon Lord/AP hide caption

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Leon Lord/AP

From left, Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, U.S. President Joe Biden and Germany's Chancellor Olaf Scholz speak as NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg, back, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listen during a NATO summit on Russia's invasion of Ukraine in Brussels on March 24, 2022. Henry Nicholls/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Henry Nicholls/Pool/Getty Images

Russian army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, is seen behind glass during a court hearing in Kyiv on Wednesday. He went on trial in Ukraine for the killing of an unarmed civilian and pleaded guilty. It is the first time a member of the Russian military has been prosecuted for a war crime since Russia invaded Ukraine in February. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

A TV screen shows a news report on North Korea's missile launch with file footage of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at a train station in Seoul on May 4. North Korea launched a ballistic missile toward its eastern waters, South Korean and Japanese officials said, days Kim vowed to bolster his nuclear arsenal "at the fastest possible pace" and threatened to use them against rivals. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

North Korea may conduct a missile or nuclear test timed with Biden's visit to Asia

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Hundreds of people gather near a U.S. Air Force C-17 transport plane at the perimeter of the international airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Aug. 16, 2021. SIGAR, released its interim report Wednesday detailing why Afghanistan's government and military collapsed immediately after the U.S. withdrawal. Shekib Rahmani/AP hide caption

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Shekib Rahmani/AP

The U.S. deal with the Taliban destroyed Afghans' military morale, a new report says

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Deputy Director of Naval Intelligence Scott Bray, left, and Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security Ronald Moultrie speak Tuesday during a House Intelligence, Counterterrorism, Counterintelligence, and Counterproliferation Subcommittee hearing on "Unidentified Aerial Phenomena" on Capitol Hill in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A wall painted with portraits of prisoners of the Basque separatist armed group ETA, in the small village of Hernani, northern Spain, on May 2, 2018. Alvaro Barrientos/AP hide caption

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Alvaro Barrientos/AP

Burned-out Russian tanks stand on the road between Malaya Rohan and Vil'Khivka, Ukraine, just east of Kharkiv. Both villages were in Russian hands for much of March and into April. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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People are picking up the pieces around Kharkiv after liberation by Ukrainian forces

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