Education We've been to school. We know how education works. Right? In fact, many aspects of learning — in homes, at schools, at work and elsewhere — are evolving rapidly, along with our understanding of learning. Join us as we explore how learning happens.

Education

Activists hold cancel student debt signs as they gather to rally in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Aug. 25. Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Candles and flowers are left at a memorial honoring four slain University of Idaho students at the Mad Greek restaurant in Moscow, Idaho, on Tuesday. Two of the victims, Madison Mogen, 21, and Xana Kernodle, 20, were servers at the restaurant. Nicholas K. Geranios/AP hide caption

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Nicholas K. Geranios/AP

Emily Blunt as Lady Cornelia Locke in The English. Diego Lopez Calvin/Amazon Prime Video hide caption

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Diego Lopez Calvin/Amazon Prime Video

First-grader Rylee plays with a puppet during class. Ryan T. Conaty for NPR hide caption

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Ryan T. Conaty for NPR

In one first-grade classroom, puppets teach children to 'shake out the yuck'

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President Biden speaks about student loan debt relief at Delaware State University last month. A judge in Texas blocked Biden's plan to provide millions of borrowers with up to $20,000 apiece in federal student-loan forgiveness. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Harvard University has had the largest academic endowment since 1986. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

As Harvard's endowment abandons fossil fuels, oil-rich University of Texas catches up

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Clockwise from top left: Sarah Huckabee Sanders, Stacey Abrams, Wes Moore, Tina Kotek, Maura Healey, and Kathy Hochul. All are 2022 candidates for governor who would make history if elected. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; Nathan Posner/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images; Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images; Mary Schwalm/AP; Anthony Behar/Sipa/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images; Nathan Posner/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images; Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images; Mary Schwalm/AP; Anthony Behar/Sipa/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Mathieu Lewis-Rolland/Getty Images

Six races for governor that could make history this midterm election

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Republican Gov. Brian Kemp speaks to supporters at a campaign stop in Marietta, Ga., on Nov. 3. Kemp emphasized how he kept businesses open during the pandemic despite criticism from Democrats and health experts. "Who was fighting for you then when the political winds were blowing a different way?" he said. Riley Bunch/GPB hide caption

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Riley Bunch/GPB

In Georgia, Kemp and Abrams underscore why governors matter

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The U.S. Supreme Court Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Supreme Court's conservatives are openly hostile to affirmative action in admissions

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The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments on the use of race in college admissions. Eric Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Can race play a role in college admissions? The Supreme Court hears the arguments

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Tucker Bubacz, a 17-year-old senior, climbs into the cab of a semi truck just outside Williamsport High School in Williamsport, Md. on Monday, Oct. 17, 2022. Amanda Berg for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Berg for NPR

The driver of the big rig one lane over might soon be one of these teenagers

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Janice Chang for NPR

You asked us about Biden's student debt relief plan. We found the answers

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President Joe Biden speaks on the student debt relief plan as Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona listens in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on Oct. 17, 2022, in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images