Infectious Disease : Goats and Soda Infectious Disease
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

Infectious Disease

Aerial view of the Beckton Sewage Treatment Works in London. Between February and May, U.K. scientists found several samples containing closely related versions of the polio virus in wastewater at the plant. mwmbwls/Flickr hide caption

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mwmbwls/Flickr

Freetown Elementary School students Mason Santos, left, and Mila Talbot, right, pet Huntah the dog after she finishes checking a classroom. Jodi Hilton for NPR hide caption

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Jodi Hilton for NPR

Dogs trained to sniff out COVID in schools are getting a lot of love for their efforts

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A positive result on a home COVID test. If you catch it once, can you catch it again? Turns out the answer is: Yes. Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

President Joe Biden speaks at the virtual Global COVID-19 Summit on Sept. 22, 2021, in Washington, D.C. On May 12, the White House will host the second Global COVID-19 Summit. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A child receives a polio vaccine in Kampala, Uganda, on Jan. 14, 2022. Nicholas Kajoba/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kajoba/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Vaccine-derived polio is on the rise. A new vaccine aims to stop the spread

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Hussein Raad, a 22-year-old college student, gets his second dose of the Pfizer vaccine at Zayoona Mall in Baghdad. Ahmed Kusy Mostafa hide caption

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Ahmed Kusy Mostafa

Iraq has enough doses of COVID vaccine for everyone. But many Iraqis don't trust it

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Health workers share information about tuberculosis with residents of aslum neighborhoods in New Delhi. India has the greatest number of TB cases in the world. Prakash Singh/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Singh/AFP via Getty Images

A colorized electron microscope image from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases shows a single human immunodeficiency virus budding from a human immune cell. AP hide caption

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AP

A resident receives a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a health center in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Jan. 13. This week, Indonesia started a program to give booster shots to the elderly and people at risk of severe disease. Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Booster longevity: Data reveals how long a third shot protects

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Health workers administer COVID tests outside a building placed under lockdown in Hong Kong on Jan. 6. Hong Kong is imposing strict new COVID measures for the first time in almost a year as the omicron variant seeps into the community. Louise Delmotte//Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Louise Delmotte//Bloomberg via Getty Images

Welcome to the era of omicron rules and regs

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Left to right: An illustration of the coronavirus, an illustration of the delta variant and a mural in India. Hanna Barczyk for NPR / Juan Gaertner/Science Source / Sanchit Khanna/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Hanna Barczyk for NPR / Juan Gaertner/Science Source / Sanchit Khanna/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Our 11 most-read global pandemic stories of 2021

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A Santa Claus in Germany wears a surgical mask in December 2020. If you're planning to take the kids to see Santa this year, experts say it's safest to keep everyone's masks on. Caroline Seidel/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Caroline Seidel/picture alliance via Getty Images

Jacqueline Muna Musiitwa, left, and her mom, Anne Sikwibele, at the airport in Lusaka, Zambia, in November. Musiitwa, who lives in Washington, D.C., is worried that her mom may not be able to visit the U.S. for Christmas. In an effort to stem the spread of the omicron variant, several nations have imposed travel bans on southern African nations, which are in a state of flux. Jacqueline Muna Musiitwa hide caption

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Jacqueline Muna Musiitwa