Women & Girls : Goats and Soda Women & Girls
Goats and Soda

Goats and Soda

STORIES OF LIFE IN A CHANGING WORLD

Women & Girls

A patient talks with a nurse at a traveling contraception clinic in Madagascar run by MSI Reproductive Choices, an organization that provides contraception and safe abortion services in 37 countries. The group condemned the overturn of Roe v. Wade and warned that the ruling could stymie abortion access overseas. Samantha Reinders for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Samantha Reinders for NPR

Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai at the Australian Open tennis championship in Melbourne in 2020. In a social media post on Tuesday, she described her alleged assault ten years ago at the hands of one of the country's most powerful Communist Party officials, Zhang Gaoli. Bai Xue/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bai Xue/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Dr. Saleema Rehman stands outside Holy Family Hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The Afghan refugee of Turkmen origin has won UNHCR's Nansen Award for her work helping refugee moms and babies in Pakistan. Betsy Joles for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Betsy Joles for NPR

M. dances at a go-go bar. She was working as a topless dancer — and also as a sex worker — in the tourist city of Pattaya, Thailand, until the bar closed down in January. She decided to return to her hometown to look for work in a different sector. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Allison Joyce for NPR

Volunteers and trainees with the group Bikeygees at a park in Berlin in July. The organization teaches refugee women in Germany how to ride bikes. Trainee Shapol Bakir-Rasoul, a refugee from Iraq, holds up a Bikeygees sign with founder Annette Krüger, right. Behind them in yellow is volunteer Shaha Khalef, a refugee from Iraq. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Deborah Amos/NPR

'A Beautiful Feeling': Refugee Women In Germany Learn The Joy Of Riding Bikes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1028084787/1028233146" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Alibaba's headquarters in Hangzhou, China. A female employee at the tech company is alleging that she was sexually assaulted by her manager. Long Wei/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Long Wei/VCG via Getty Images

From left: Giovanna Basso, Mofiyin Onanuga, Emma Fetzer and Joanne Lee are teen leaders for the U.N.-sponsored gender equality group Girl Up. They attended Girl Up's virtual conference last week, which featured Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai as a guest speaker. Giovanna Basso, Mofiyin Onanuga, Emma Fetzer, Joanne Lee hide caption

toggle caption
Giovanna Basso, Mofiyin Onanuga, Emma Fetzer, Joanne Lee

Pooja Sharma (center) and her two daughters, Lata, 14, and Yukti, 12, sit in front of a portrait of Sharma's late husband and the girls' father, Manmohan. He died from COVID-19 in April, leaving Sharma to fend for her family by herself. Pooja Sharma hide caption

toggle caption
Pooja Sharma

From left: Home cooked food at Srabasti Ghosh's home, ready for delivery. A volunteer delivers food to COVID-19 patients outside their home. Ghosh (right) with a friend who has joined to help. Srabasti Ghosh hide caption

toggle caption
Srabasti Ghosh

Marissa Tuping, a rural midwife, and Risa Calibuso, right, arrive in Nueva Vizcaya Provincial Hospital on July 21. Calibuso gave birth to her son moments later. Xyza Cruz Bacani For NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Xyza Cruz Bacani For NPR

Joan Garcia became pregnant at 14 and gave birth at 15. She and her child travel by raft between the two shacks where they live in Navotas fish port on Manila Bay. Hannah Reyes Morales for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Hannah Reyes Morales for NPR

Eliza Chikoti, 24, is a mentor to high school girls in Malawi. She is helping girls through their personal problems amid the pandemic — and encouraging them to stay in school. Anke Adams hide caption

toggle caption
Anke Adams

Girls, Has The Pandemic Made You Think Of Quitting School? Call Your Mentor

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/891422484/895867568" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript