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The House Select Committee has used TV news techniques and documentary evidence to argue that then President Donald Trump knowingly pressured public officials to commit illegal acts. In this case, the panel displayed a transcript of his call to Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger as it played excerpts of the audio. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Lots of onions. Jess Jiang/NPR hide caption

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Jess Jiang/NPR

The tale of the Onion King (Update)

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Mark Shields speaks during a taping of NBC's Meet the Press on Feb. 17, 2008, in Washington, D.C. The longtime PBS NewsHour commentator has died at age 85. Alex Wong/Getty Images for Meet the Press hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images for Meet the Press
Alex Wong/Getty Images

The debate over what's causing inflation

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Mary Rich, shown with her husband, Joel, at their home in Omaha, Neb., says self-promoters they trusted to help solve the killing of their son took advantage of them. "You're a total sucker," Mary Rich says. "I think every day: Who's going to bug us? What's coming at us? I will always think that." Walker Pickering for NPR hide caption

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Walker Pickering for NPR

Seth Rich's killing was exploited on Fox News and online. His parents are fed up

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Former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt spoke to NPR minutes after testifying Monday to the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. "Television ... really damaged the capacity of Americans to be good citizens in a republic because they confused the TV show with the real thing," Stirewalt told NPR. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Fired Fox News politics editor: Trump's ire at election night call led to 'panic'

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On The Case: Recession, Formula, and Greenbacks

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Joe Kahn will become The New York Times' executive editor on June 14. Now the paper's managing editor, he first joined The Times in 1998. Celeste Sloman for The New York Times hide caption

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Celeste Sloman for The New York Times

A mural on a wall in Kyiv on Monday depicts an image of "Saint Javelina" — the Virgin Mary cradling a U.S.-made Javelin. These missiles are among the weapons sent by Western allies to Ukrainian forces to aid in their fight against Russia. The Javelin is widely considered a symbol of Ukraine's defense. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP
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A note from the Second Bank of the United States. Museum of American Finance, NYC hide caption

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Museum of American Finance, NYC

The bank war (Classic)

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Trisha Pickelhaupt for NPR

PM Live: The Most Collectible Comic Book Ever?

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Charlton Heston (left), then president of the NRA, meets with fellow leaders Wayne LaPierre (far right) and Jim Baker (center) on April 30, 1999, ahead of the NRA's annual meeting in Denver. Around the same time, leaders discussed how to respond to the shooting at Columbine High School in nearby Littleton, Colo. More than 20 years later, NPR has obtained secret recordings of those conversations. Kevin Moloney/Getty hide caption

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Kevin Moloney/Getty

On Wednesday, The Onion's website was plastered with variations of the satirical piece it's republished after more than 20 mass shootings. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR