Editors' Picks A selection of stories handpicked by NPR Music editors.

Editors' Picks

Patrick Shiroishi — pictured here in Los Angeles — released 19 albums in 2022; at least three were standouts in their respective fields, in part because of the questions of identity they examine. Sean Hazen for NPR hide caption

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Sean Hazen for NPR

YoungBoy Never Broke Again (aka NBA YoungBoy) is among a handful of rappers who achieved massive streaming numbers in 2022 while remaining nearly invisible to the pop establishment. Simone Noronha for NPR hide caption

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Simone Noronha for NPR

Bad Bunny has a preternatural gift for realness, one that he wields with fluidity, because that is what Caribbeanness demands. It makes his fame feel delightful and deviant. Illustration: Simone Noronha for NPR hide caption

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Illustration: Simone Noronha for NPR

In 2022, Bad Bunny made pop stardom a subversive act

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The classical singer Julia Bullock has released Walking in the Dark, her debut solo album. Grant Legan/Nonesuch Records hide caption

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Grant Legan/Nonesuch Records

With a bold debut album, Julia Bullock curates an unconventional career

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Bruce Springsteen Danny Clinch/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Danny Clinch/Courtesy of the artist

Bruce Springsteen on World Cafe

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Daddy Yankee helped build a global market for reggaeton — but he also illustrated how much political power the genre wields. Victor Bizar Gomez for NPR hide caption

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Victor Bizar Gomez for NPR

At the Appalachian School of Luthiery in Hindman, Ky., days after July's catastrophic floods, luthier Kris Patrick searches through the mud-caked remains of instruments and materials. Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Arden S. Barnes/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Super Deluxe version of The Beatles album Revolver includes a remixed version of the original recordings, outtakes, demos and more. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

You've never heard The Beatles' 'Revolver' sound like this

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Jamaaladeen Tacuma in front of the Whiteville Bus Station Sound Evidence/Courtesy of Artist hide caption

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Sound Evidence/Courtesy of Artist

Bassist Jamaaladeen Tacuma reflects on his journey down a 'Dirt Road' in N. Carolina

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Bono, left, with Morning Edition co-host Rachel Martin. Nickolai Hammar/NPR hide caption

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Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Bono discusses his new memoir, 'Surrender,' and the faith at U2's core

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Composer Julia Wolfe at the Nashville Symphony Orchestra's world premiere of her piece Her Story on Sept. 15, 2022. Kurt Heinecke/Nashville Symphony hide caption

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Kurt Heinecke/Nashville Symphony

Our biggest orchestras are finally playing more music by women. What took so long?

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That Loretta Lynn sang about women's struggles while masterfully projecting the image of an uncorrupted country girl made her all the more convincing as an artist. Star Tribune via Getty Images hide caption

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Star Tribune via Getty Images