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Wallace Broecker, a professor at Columbia University in New York, speaking during the Balzan Prize ceremony in Rome in 2008. Broecker, a climate scientist who popularized the term "global warming," died Monday. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

Veiled women reportedly associated with ISIS walk under the supervision of a female fighter from the Syrian Democratic Forces in northeastern Syria on Sunday. Over the weekend, President Trump demanded European allies repatriate their citizens captured as ISIS fighters. Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic /AFP/Getty Images

A section of border wall separates Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego, as seen from the U.S. in January. California has filed a lawsuit along with 15 other states, calling President Trump's use of a national emergency declaration to redirect money toward border wall construction unconstitutional. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before Senate committees in April. But he hasn't appeared before British Parliament, despite its requests for him to do so. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson announces changes to the state Medicaid program called Arkansas Works, including the addition of a work requirement for certain beneficiaries, on March 6, 2017. Michael Hibblen/KUAR hide caption

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Michael Hibblen/KUAR

In Arkansas, Thousands Of People Have Lost Medicaid Coverage Over New Work Rule

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Bret Adee, a third-generation beekeeper who owns one of the largest beekeeping companies in the U.S., lost half of his hives — about 50,000 — over the winter. He pops the lid on one of the hives to show off the colony inside. Greta Mart/KCBX hide caption

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Greta Mart/KCBX

Massive Loss Of Thousands Of Hives Afflicts Orchard Growers And Beekeepers

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Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has vowed to launch an investigation into whether officials at the Justice Department and the FBI were plotting a "bureaucratic coup" to oust President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The History Of American Imperialism, From Bloody Conquest To Bird Poop

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British politician Luciana Berger speaks Monday at a news conference to announce the formation of the Independent Group, as seven British members of Parliament quit the Labour Party because of its approach to Brexit and anti-Semitism. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

UNOCHA's new set of icons aims to streamline communication in response to humanitarian crises. United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs hide caption

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United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

Chico Housing Action Team organizers Leslie Johnson, left, Charles Withuhn, center, and Bill Kurnizki, right, in the field in south Chico where they plan to soon break ground on a 33-unit tiny home community for homeless adults called Simplicity Village. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

Tiny Homes For Homeless Get The Go-Ahead In The Wake of California's Worst Wildfire

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Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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