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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that most new heroin addicts first became hooked on prescription painkillers, such as oxycodone, before graduating to heroin, which is cheaper. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Tales Of Corporate Painkiller Pushing: 'The Death Rates Just Soared'

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According to the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll exercise, including stretching and yoga, is popular among younger people as a way to relieve pain. Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Daniel Grill/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

Mahmee CEO Melissa Hanna (right) and her mother, Linda Hanna (left), co-founded the company in 2014. Linda's more than 40 years of clinical experience as a registered nurse and certified lactation consultant helped them understand the need, they say. Keith Alcantara/Mahmee hide caption

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Keith Alcantara/Mahmee

This App Aims To Save New Moms' Lives

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Robert Findley died after falling on the ice during a winter storm this February in Fort Scott, Kan. Mercy Hospital had recently closed, so he had to be flown to a neurology center 90 miles north in Kansas City, Mo. Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Christopher Smith for Kaiser Health News

No Mercy: After The Hospital Closes, How Do People Get Emergency Care?

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The wide-open spaces of Arco, Idaho, appeal to some doctors with a love of the outdoors. Thomas Hawk/Flickr hide caption

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Thomas Hawk/Flickr

Creative Recruiting Helps Rural Hospitals Overcome Doctor Shortages

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The "Cadillac tax," an enacted but not yet implemented part of the Affordable Care Act, is a 40% tax on the most generous employer-provided health insurance plans — those that cost more than $11,200 per year for an individual policy or $30,150 for family coverage. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Creative/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg Creative/Getty Images

A Newark, N.J., resident carries a case of bottled water distributed Monday at a recreation center. The Environmental Protection Agency said residents shouldn't rely on water filters the city gave out to address lead contamination. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Richard Ost owns Philadelphia Pharmacy, in the city's Kensington neighborhood. He says he has stopped carrying Suboxone, for the most part, because the illegal market for the drug brought unwanted traffic to his store. Nina Feldman/WHYY hide caption

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Nina Feldman/WHYY

It's The Go-To Drug To Treat Opioid Addiction. Why Won't More Pharmacies Stock It?

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At Nashville's "High Five" camp, 12-year-old Priceless Garinger (center), whose right side has been weakened by cerebral palsy, wears a full-length, bright pink cast on her left arm — though that arm's strong and healthy. By using her weaker right arm and hand to decorate a cape, she hopes to gain a stronger grip and fine motor control. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

At 'High Five' Camp, Struggling With A Disability Is The Point

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If a doctor is found to be ordering too many MRI or CT scans or other imaging tests for Medicare patients, a federal law is supposed to require the physician to get federal approval for all diagnostic imaging. But the Trump administration has stalled the law's implementation. laflor/Getty Images hide caption

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In the U.S., firearms kill more people through suicide than homicide. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How The CDC's Reluctance To Use The 'F-Word' — Firearms — Hinders Suicide Prevention

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John Poynter of Clarksville, Tenn., uses a wall calendar to keep track of all his appointments for both behavioral health and physical ailments. His mental health case manager, Valerie Klein, appears regularly on the calendar — and helps make sure he gets to his diabetes appointments. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Coordinating Care Of Mind And Body Might Help Medicaid Save Money And Lives

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Robyn Adcock (left), a University of California, San Francisco pain relief specialist, gently guides Jessica Greenfield to acupressure points on her son's foot and leg that have helped relieve his chronic pain. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Pain Rescue Team Helps Seriously Ill Kids Cope In Terrible Times

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A Guatemalan teen asylum-seeker (left), who isn't able to hear or speak, signs with his mom in Florida. He was brusquely separated from her and held in a shelter for nearly three months, unable to readily communicate, according to a civil rights complaint filed with the Department of Homeland Security. Susan Ferriss/Center for Public Integrity hide caption

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Susan Ferriss/Center for Public Integrity

Homeland Security's Civil Rights Unit Lacks Power To Protect Migrant Kids

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Plump red blood cells — tumbling amid infection-fighting white blood cells and purple platelets in this colorized, microscopic view — need adequate levels of iron to be able to carry and deliver oxygen around the body. Iron-deficiency anemia is sometimes remedied with IV iron infusions — and the bill can vary by thousands of dollars. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

"As deductibles rise, patients have the right to know the price of health care services so they can shop around for the best deal," says Seema Verma, who heads the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and announced the Trump administration's plan this week. Kevin Wolf/AP hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP