Health Care The state of health care, health insurance, new medical research, disease prevention, and drug treatments. Interviews, news, and commentary from NPR's correspondents. Subscribe to podcasts.

Health Care

Abortion rights demonstrators gather near the Washington Monument during a nationwide rally in support of abortion rights in Washington, D.C., US, on May 14, 2022. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Why Abortion Access Is Important For A Healthy Community

Abortion access has been leading political news in recent weeks. But what happens when we look at abortion as a health care tool that betters public health? Today, Emily talks to Liza Fuentes, a Senior Research Scientist at the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that focuses on sexual and reproductive health. Fuentes says abortion access is an important part of health care for a community and losing access can exacerbate income and health inequalities.

Why Abortion Access Is Important For A Healthy Community

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100785583/1100891567" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man uses a safe injection site in New York City in January. A bill in California would allow pilot sites in San Francisco, Oakland and Los Angeles. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Workers at a family planning health center get emotional as thousands of abortion rights advocates march past their clinic on their way into downtown Chicago on May 14, 2022. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Some clinics are bracing for a huge influx of patients if Roe v. Wade is overturned

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099875395/1099890578" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tony Johnson sits on his bed with his dog, Dash, in the one-room home he shares with his wife, Karen Johnson, in a care facility in Burlington, Wash. on April 13, 2022. Johnson was one of the first people to get COVID-19 in Washington state in April of 2020. His left leg had to be amputated due to lack of wound care after he developed blood clots in his feet while on a ventilator. Lynn Johnson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Lynn Johnson for NPR

Nurse educator Katie Demelis and nurse manager Nydia White wrap the the body of a patient who died of COVID-19 at Mount Sinai South Nassau hospital in Oceanside, N.Y., on April 15, 2020. Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images

Protesters hold up signs during an abortion rights demonstration Saturday in New York City. Jeenah Moon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeenah Moon/AP

Reproductive rights supporters rally across the country

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098952510/1098958739" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

RaDonda Vaught listens to victim impact statements during her sentencing in Nashville. She was found guilty in March of criminally negligent homicide and gross neglect of an impaired adult after she accidentally administered the wrong medication. Nicole Hester/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Nicole Hester/AP

Christina and James Summers were married for 17 years. Now, she's learning to navigate life without him. "Me and my husband really worked like a team," she says. "My teammate's not here to help me, so I'm really feeling a single mom vibe, just trying to get accustomed to this." Rosem Morton for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rosem Morton for NPR

COVID took many in the prime of life, leaving families to pick up the pieces

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1089783785/1098735781" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An attendee holds her child during A Texas Rally for Abortion Rights at Discovery Green in Houston, Texas, on May 7. Recently passed laws make abortion illegal after about six weeks into a pregnancy. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

An abortion-rights protester holds up a sign during a demonstration in front of the Supreme Court on Saturday in Washington, D.C. Less than a week since the leaked draft of the Court's potential decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, protesters on both sides of the abortion debate continue to demonstrate in front of the building which has been fortified by a temporary fence. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Abortion providers and advocates experience déjà vu as Roe v. Wade is threatened

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097609646/1097610217" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Signs on a temporary fence around the U.S. Supreme Court building on May 05, 2022 in Washington, DC. Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anna Moneymaker / Getty Images

The Turnaway Study: What The Research Says About Abortion

A leaked draft opinion in the Supreme Court case Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization has placed uncertainty on the future of abortion rights in the United States. As written, the opinion would overturn Roe v. Wade protections. We at Short Wave were immediately curious about the data behind abortions: What happens when pregnant people are denied abortions?

The Turnaway Study: What The Research Says About Abortion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097000680/1097351313" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Michigan State Capitol building is seen on Oct. 8, 2020, in Lansing. A Michigan law from 1931 would make abortion a felony in the state if the Roe v. Wade decision is overturned. Rey Del Rio/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rey Del Rio/Getty Images

A Michigan law from 1931 would make abortion a felony if Roe falls

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1097205107/1099748226" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Variety of medical supplies Peter Stark/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Stark/Getty Images/fStop

Lessons From HIV On Ending The COVID Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1096875238/1096982035" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jon Miller sits in his bedroom with his dog, Carlos, whom he received as a present for successfully completing cancer treatment a decade ago. Miller sustained severe brain damage, and requires the help of home health aides to continue living in his home. Natalie Krebs/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

toggle caption
Natalie Krebs/Side Effects Public Media

Pro-choice activists protest in response to the leaked Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in front of the U.S. Supreme Court May 3, 2022 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Retiree Donna Weiner shows some of the daily prescription medications for which she pays more than $6,000 per year through a Medicare prescription drug plan. She supports giving Medicare authority to negotiate drug prices. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

Lisa Pascoe avoids wearing jewelry her young daughter might put in her mouth, and doesn't visit older or recently renovated homes that could contain lead hazards. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio
Subin Yang for NPR

6 tips to help you get the most out of your health insurance plan

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1095250662/1095262907" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rachel Levine, U.S. assistant secretary for health, says, "The language of medicine and science is being used to drive people to suicide." Political attacks against trans young people are on the rise across the country. Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images

Rachel Levine calls state anti-LGBTQ bills disturbing and dangerous to trans youth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1095227346/1095642569" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript