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Boeing's Starliner capsule atop an Atlas V rocket is seen at Space Launch Complex 41 at the Cape Canaveral Space Force Station on May 7, a day after its mission to the International Space Station was scrubbed because of an issue with a pressure regulation valve. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

The Hubble Space Telescope in 2009, locked in a space shuttle's cargo bay, before the final repair work ever done. NASA/JSC hide caption

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NASA/JSC

Private mission to save the Hubble Space Telescope raises concerns, NASA emails show

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Crosby Beach, Liverpool, England: The aurora borealis, also known as the northern lights, glow on the horizon at Another Place by Anthony Gormley. Peter Byrne /PA Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Byrne /PA Images/Getty Images

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of a strong solar flare on May 8, 2024. The Wednesday solar flares kicked off the geomagnetic storm happening this weekend. NASA/SDO hide caption

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NASA/SDO

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of solar flares early Saturday afternoon. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says there have been measurable effects and impacts from the geomagnetic storm. Solar Dynamics Observatory hide caption

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Solar Dynamics Observatory

The huge solar storm is keeping power grid and satellite operators on edge

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Lily Padula for NPR

Venus and Earth used to look like 'twin' planets. What happened?

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NASA Administrator Bill Nelson at the space agency's headquarters in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Elizabeth Gillis/NPR hide caption

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Elizabeth Gillis/NPR

NASA's chief is worried about China getting back to the moon first. Here's why

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Actor Mark Hamill, wearing a pair of aviator shades he said he got from President Biden, makes a surprise appearance in the White House daily press briefing on May 3. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Cumming/Getty Images

This illustration shows the Milky Way, our home galaxy. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

A Long March rocket carrying a crew of Chinese astronauts in a Shenzhou-18 spaceship lifts off at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwestern China on Thursday. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Ed Dwight poses for a portrait in February to promote the National Geographic documentary film The Space Race during the Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour in Pasadena, Calif. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

In March 2021, mission controllers in Houston used the Canadarm2 robotic arm to release an external pallet packed with old nickel-hydrogen batteries from the International Space Station. Three years later, part of that assembly struck a house in Naples, Fla. NASA hide caption

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NASA
Connie Hanzhang Jin

COMIC: Our sun was born with thousands of other stars. Where did they all go?

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A new lunar time zone has been pitched for the moon. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

NASA has been asked to create a time zone for the moon. Here's how it would work

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People visit a NASA information booth to grab solar eclipse glasses in Russellville, Arkansas. The space agency has debunked a number of myths about the total solar eclipse — including ideas about food going bad, or unborn babies being harmed. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images