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Wim Janssen, one of the musicians involved in the recording project, plays a viola made by master luthier Girolamo Amati in 1615. Courtesy of Native Instruments hide caption

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Courtesy of Native Instruments

"There was no way I was letting anybody know I wanted to do music, but I just kept getting pushed in musical directions," TeaMarrr says. Tryen Redd/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tryen Redd/Courtesy of the artist

Dutch superstar DJ Tiesto (seen here performing in Miami in February 2019) released a massively popular electronic reworking of Samuel Barber's Adagio for Strings in 2005. Paras Griffin/Getty Images for E11EVEN Miami hide caption

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images for E11EVEN Miami

From Funerals To Festivals, The Curious Journey Of The 'Adagio For Strings'

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Songwriter Holly Knight is known for pushing hitmakers to new heights and depicting female empowerment in her songs. Matthew Beard/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Matthew Beard/Courtesy of the artist

The Women Behind The Songs: Holly Knight

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David Rawlings and Gillian Welch wrote "When A Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings" for the Joel and Ethan Cohen Film The Ballad of Buster Scruggs. Henry Diltz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Henry Diltz/Courtesy of the artist

Kacey Musgraves poses in the press room during the 61st Annual Grammy Awards on February 10, 2019. Amanda Edwards/Getty Images hide caption

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Amanda Edwards/Getty Images

Kacey Musgraves holds the four Grammys she won Sunday night. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for The Recording Academy hide caption

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Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

10 Takeaways From The 2019 Grammy Awards

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In a pointed moment, host Alicia Keys (center) opened the 61st Grammy Awards by bringing out Lady Gaga (left), Jada Pinkett Smith (second from left), Michelle Obama (second from right) and Jennifer Lopez (right) to speak about women and music. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Noted for its sharp commentary on race, identity, sex and politics, Noname's album, Room 25, was one of the most critically-acclaimed records of last year. Chantal Anderson/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Chantal Anderson/Courtesy of the artist

'We Need To Exist In Multitudes': Noname Talks Artistic Independence, Women In Rap

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Cedric Burnside plays Vaudeville Mews in Des Moines, Iowa on Dec. 1, 2018 in support of his Grammy Nominated "Benton County Relic." Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio

Grammy-Nominated Blues Musician Cedric Burnside Remembers His Roots

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Izzy Young in Sept. 2007. Frank Beacham/Courtesy of Frank Beacham hide caption

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Frank Beacham/Courtesy of Frank Beacham

Izzy Young, Center To The Folk Music Revival, Dies At 90

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Grammy trophies sit in the press room during the 60th Annual Grammy Awards, held in New York in Jan. 2018. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

A Year After The #MeToo Grammys, Women Are Still Missing In Music

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Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil pose for a portrait circa 1966. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

The Women Behind The Songs: Cynthia Weil

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