Environment Breaking news on the environment, climate change, pollution, and endangered species. Also featuring Climate Connections, a special series on climate change co-produced by NPR and National Geographic.

Environment

Joro spider sits in the middle of a spider web. GummyBone/Getty Images hide caption

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The illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be a multi-billion dollar enterprise. Live animals that are caught, like this box turtle, need immediate and long-term care at facilities like The Turtle Conservancy. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Mangroves are unique ecosystems protecting humans and wildlife. Sea level rise and more severe storms from climate change threaten them, according to a new global assessment. Sia Kambou /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sia Kambou /AFP via Getty Images

A sea otter in Monterey Bay with a rock anvil on its belly and a scallop in its forepaws. Jessica Fujii hide caption

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Jessica Fujii

When sea otters lose their favorite foods, they can use tools to go after new ones

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Sperm whale families talk a lot. Researchers are trying to decode what they're saying

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A burial team in Liberia awaits decontamination after performing "safe burials" for people who died of Ebola during the 2014-15 outbreak. Strains of the virus are harbored by bats and primates. A new study looks at how human activity affects the transmission of infectious diseases like Ebola. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Jackye Lafon, who's in her 80s, cools herself with a water spray at her home in Toulouse, France during a heat wave in 2022. Older people face higher heat risk than those who are younger. Climate change is making heat risk even greater. Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images

More than 200 million seniors face extreme heat risks in coming decades, study finds

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Lauren Hill, a graduate student at Cal State LA, holds a bird at the bird banding site at Bear Divide in the San Gabriel Mountains. Grace Widyatmadja/NPR hide caption

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Grace Widyatmadja/NPR

On this unassuming trail near LA, bird watchers see something spectacular

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People cycle along the street in Afuá, a city in northern Brazil's Pará state, in January. Since 2002, this city on the banks of the Amazon River has been famously off limits to motor vehicles. Stefan Kolumban hide caption

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Stefan Kolumban

Isabella Mogeni, 54, from the neighborhood of Mukuru kwa Reuben, looks on as bulldozers destroy homes in the slum area on May 3. Emmanuel Igunza for NPR hide caption

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Emmanuel Igunza for NPR

In Kenya's flooded slums, people mourn their losses and slam their leaders

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Christiane Keyhani (bottom left) and Liz Yannell (bottom right), of the non-profit group Hui O Ka Wai Ola, measure water quality along Lahaina's coast. The group is part of a coalition that mobilized in the wake of the fire to closely monitor the water quality off Lahaina. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Maui community mobilizes to protect water quality from runoff after Lahaina fires

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A woman takes refuge during Greece's July 2023 heat wave. El Niño helped drive global temperatures to new heights, making it the hottest year on record. Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP via Getty Images

Tina Riley moved to Idaho recently in search of a new career working in the clean energy transition. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

Oil industry could help the Biden administration tap 'invisible' green energy

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